People In Politics


People in Politics May 7, 2016 PDF Print E-mail
People In Politics
Friday, 06 May 2016 05:46

He’s out! The state Republican Party gives the heave-ho to its chairman, Hasan Harnett, replacing him with former chairman Robin Hayes. The move comes after a year of tension and turmoil between the grassroots conservative wing of the party and the establishment types. Host Donna Martinez talks with Rick Martinez, vice president of news and information for Curtis Media Group about the dynamic of the insider versus the outsider and what comes next for state Republicans. Speaking of tug of war, it looks like Donald Trump will be the Republican presidential nominee following his trouncing of Ted Cruz in Indiana. Meantime, Bernie Sanders continues to beat Hillary Clinton, yet news media seem ho-hum about his growing strength within a party that has moved decidedly to the left following the election of Barack Obama. Donna and Rick discuss the implications of a Trump versus Clinton race. Then we turn to money in politics. The Federal Election Commission has ruled unanimously that North Carolina’s June 7 congressional primary election represents a completely new fundraising cycle, meaning donors who had maxed out previously can begin at zero leading up to June 7. The opinion had been sought by George Holding, who is one of three Republicans seeking the party’s nomination for the 2nd District seat in Congress, now held by Renee Ellmers. Martinez talks with the third person in the race, Dr. Greg Brannon, about his views on issues and the distinctions he seems between himself and Holding and Ellmers. Finally, Martinez reports on the gearing up the gubernatorial race as both governors associations weigh in with ads for and against Democrat Roy Cooper and Republican incumbent Pat McCrory.

 
People in Politics April 30, 2016 PDF Print E-mail
People In Politics
Friday, 29 April 2016 06:27

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 
 
North Carolina’s controversial voter I.D. law IS constitutional. That’s the ruling handed down this week by federal Judge Thomas Schroeder, who rejected charges of discrimination and disenfranchisement made by critics of House Bill 589. The election reform law was passed by the General Assembly in 2013 and signed into law by Gov. Pat McCrory. In a 485-page ruling, Judge Schroeder outlines why critics failed to prove their allegations about voting law changes, most especially the provision that a photo I.D. is required to vote in North Carolina. Reaction was swift, with legislative leaders and the governor praising the ruling and the NAACP rejecting it. You’ll hear comments from Rev. William Barber, head of the North Carolina NAACP and from case attorney Irving Joyner. Then host Donna Martinez analyzes the ruling with Carolina Journal Managing Editor Rick Henderson. The two discuss several other provisions of the law that garnered criticism such as a ban on out of precinct voting. That’s followed by a look at the continuing controversy over House Bill 2, which overturned Charlotte’s controversial bathroom ordinance. National criticism has been directed toward the governor and the legislature. You’ll hear the governor discuss the law and his view that criticism is unfounded and hypocritical. Next is a look at the No. 1 priority for the state legislature, which reconvened in Raleigh this week. State Budget Director Andrew Heath addressed legislators about the state’s economic landscape as they prepare to negotiate the new state operating budget. And then we turn to presidential politics. In an election year known for kicking conventional politics to the curb, yet another unusual event this week. Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz announced his vice presidential running mate, businesswoman Carly Fiorina – but he’s not yet the nominee himself. Martinez gets reaction from Rick Martinez, vice president of news and information for Curtis Media Group. The two discuss whether Cruz’s move is brilliant new strategy or a desperate last-ditch attempt to keep Donald Trump from securing the nomination. They also analyze controversy over the role of super delegates who will likely give Democrat Hillary Clinton her party’s nomination over Bernie Sanders.
Last Updated on Thursday, 05 May 2016 08:41
 
People in Politics April 23, 2016 PDF Print E-mail
People In Politics
Friday, 22 April 2016 06:32

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 
This week, House Bill 2 continued to make national news with GOP presidential candidates taking different stands on the issue. Delegate leader Donald Trump supports the law that overturned Charlotte’s bathroom ordinance, while Sen. Ted Cruz opposes it. Their comments come in the wake of Gov. Pat McCrory’s appearance on Meet the Press, where he defended the law to host Chuck Todd. You’ll hear McCrory’s comments in a report from People in Politics special correspondent Kerri Davis. Then host Donna Martinez gets reaction to the HB 2 debate and whether or not it will impact McCrory’s bid for re-election. Martinez roundtable includes Bill LuMaye of NewsRadio 680 WPTF in Raleigh and Rick Martinez, vice president of news and information for Curtis Media Group. The panel also weighs in on two key Council of State races, where new polling shows Democrat Dan Blue III with a lead in the Treasurer’s race over his Republican rival Dale Folwell. Blue is seen as a rising star in the Democratic Party, while Folwell is a seasoned legislator and state official. Also up for analysis is the presidential election, with North Carolina a battleground once again. A new book zeroes in on Wake County, along with six other counties across the country, as a key battleground that will decide who is elected. Martinez talks with author Ed Morrissey about his book, “Going Red,” which looks at the epic failure of the Mitt Romney campaign in 2012.
Last Updated on Thursday, 28 April 2016 11:26
 
People in Politics April 16, 2016 PDF Print E-mail
People In Politics
Friday, 15 April 2016 06:11

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 
 
For three weeks, critics and supporters of House Bill 2 have traded barbs over  the new state law that overturned Charlotte’s controversial ordinance, which would have allowed transgendered individuals to use public bathrooms, showers, and locker rooms based on their gender identity rather than their anatomy. This week, Gov. Pat McCrory issued an Executive Order to clarify the safety and privacy aspects of the law, and he requested action from the General Assembly on the issue of the right to sue for discrimination in state court. You’ll hear the governor’s own words as he explains the order. Then host Donna Martinez and Mitch Kokai of the John Locke Foundation analyze the governor’s action and reaction to the order. Then the two delve into the looming possibility that national Republicans will face a contested nominating convention in Cleveland this summer. Will the party rules allow delegates to nominate someone other than Trump or Cruz? Kokai explains the rules that govern what could devolve into a chaotic scenario – rules that date back to 2012 and the Mitt Romney nomination. That’s followed by Martinez’s conversation with Wake County attorney and Supreme Court candidate Sabra Faires. Faires is the person at the heart of the legal challenge to North Carolina’s law change that would have allowed Supreme Court justices to face a retention election rather than ballot opposition. The case was heard this week. Since a court overturned that law, the race for the seat now held by Justice Robert Edmunds is on the June 7 ballot. Faires is one of four candidates. Martinez talks with her about why she sued, and why she wants to sit on the state’s highest court. While the Supreme Court was hearing the retention case in Raleigh, a Greensboro judge was hearing arguments over the drawing of North Carolina’s legislative districts. That proceeding gave advocates for redistricting reform a platform to make their case for changing the process for drawing election maps. You’ll hear comments from Jane Pinsky of the North Carolina Coalition for Government and Lobbying Reform as she stood outside the courthouse, and also from the Rev. Dr. Earl Jackson, who represented Common Cause North Carolina.
Last Updated on Monday, 18 April 2016 12:24
 
People in Politics April 9, 2016 PDF Print E-mail
People In Politics
Friday, 08 April 2016 05:52

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 
It’s colleague versus colleague in the race for the Republican nomination for the 2nd District seat in Congress. Newly drawn district maps have created new challengers for incumbent Renee Ellmers, including her fellow congressman George Holding, currently of the 13th District. Host Donna Martinez talks with Holding about his run in the 2nd, why he believes he’s a better match to the district than Ellmers, and his view on President Obama’s recent trip to Cuba. The GOP primary also includes Dr. Greg Brannon, who this week found himself on the losing end of a state Court of Appeals ruling in a civil case. Martinez provides the details. The June 7 primary ballot for the 2nd District will include the three Republicans and five Democrats. Then we turn to the politics of House Bill 2, the law that overturned Charlotte’s ordinance that would have allowed transgendered individuals to use public bathrooms associated with their gender identify, not their biological sex. The General Assembly and Gov. Pat McCrory have been criticized for supporting H.B. 2, but a new Time Warner Cable News poll shows 51 percent of those surveyed agree with the law, 40 percent disagree. Martinez talks about the political fallout with Catawba College Political Science Professor Michael Bitzer. Next is a look at the week in presidential politics. People in Politics Special Correspondent Patrick Johnson talks about the winners and losers with NC State Political Science Professor Andy Taylor and CBS Correspondent Steven Portnoy.
Last Updated on Monday, 11 April 2016 16:46
 
People in Politics April 2, 2016 PDF Print E-mail
People In Politics
Friday, 01 April 2016 06:00

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 
 
This week, you’ll hear the words of key players in the escalating controversy over a law that set aside Charlotte’s controversial bathroom ordinance. Attorney General Roy Cooper announced that he and his office will not defend the state against a lawsuit filed by the ACLU against action taken by the General Assembly and Gov. Pat McCrory. Cooper, the Democratic nominee for governor, said at a news conference that the law is an embarrassment and discriminatory. Senate Leader Phil Berger promptly called on Cooper to resign his office for failure to execute his duties. Gov. McCrory fired back at Cooper and other critics, defending the law he says is common sense privacy for women and children in public bathrooms, showers and locker rooms. Charlotte’s ordinance would have allowed transgendered individuals to use public facilities of the opposite biological gender. That’s followed by a look at the state of the gubernatorial race. Host Donna Martinez talks with Public Policy Polling’s Tom Jensen, who says McCrory has now been ahead of Cooper for two months in a row. The two-point lead is still within the margin of error. The two also discuss the tight statewide race for Lt. Governor, where Democrat Linda Coleman leads incumbent Republican Dan Forest. They also discuss the impact of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump on statewide races. The GOP race has some predicting a contested convention for Republicans this summer in Cleveland. Martinez gets perspective from N.C. State Political Science Professor Andy Taylor, who discusses the possible outcomes and impact on Republicans.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 05 April 2016 16:42
 
People in Politics March 26, 2016 PDF Print E-mail
People In Politics
Monday, 28 March 2016 06:21

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 
This week, Charlotte’s gender identify and public accommodations ordinance is struck down by the General Assembly, which passed a state anti-discrimination law supporters say protects public safety with common-sense rules, but opponents say discriminates against those who are transgendered and should be allowed to use bathrooms of the gender they choose. Gov. Pat McCrory backs the legislature. You’ll hear legislators for and against the law – Rodney Moore, Democrat of Mecklenburg County and Dean Arp, Republican of Union County. You’ll also hear the comments of high-profile advocates: Chris Sgro of Equality NC speaks out in favor of Charlotte and against the state law, while Tami Fitzgerald of the N.C. Values Coalition speaks out against Charlotte’s ordinance and in favor of the state law. Then we look at the internal dust-up in the state Republican Party. The group’s Central Committee has passed a no-confidence resolution against its chairman, Hasan Harnett. Host Donna Martinez talks with North State Journal Managing Editor Donna King, who has reported on details of the story, including an affidavit King saw and which is central to the allegations. That’s followed by a look at the Libertarian Party’s hopes for the general election. Martinez talks with J.J. Summerell, chairman of the Libertarian Party and a candidate himself.
Last Updated on Thursday, 31 March 2016 16:42
 
People in Politics March 19, 2016 PDF Print E-mail
People In Politics
Friday, 18 March 2016 06:03

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 

 
The votes are in! Big winners in North Carolina’s primary election include Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, Richard Burr, Deborah Ross, Pat McCrory, Roy Cooper, and a $2 billion bond package. Host Donna Martinez talks with political strategist Jonathan Felts about North Carolina’s role in the presidential race and whether Trump and Clinton can be stopped. Martinez gets more perspective on the presidential race from analyst Joe Stewart of the North Carolina Free Enterprise Foundation and from John Hood, chairman of the John Locke Foundation, who also looks at the failure of anti-establishment fervor to impact down-ballot races. Primary night was also a huge night for Democrat Roy Cooper and Republican Pat McCrory, who will face each other in November for the state’s top job, along with Libertarian Lon Cecil. You’ll hear some of what Cooper told his supporters on Election Night, and words from Gov. McCrory as he celebrated the passage of his signature project, a $2 billion infrastructure bond package. Connect NC coordinator Brad Crone tells Martinez about the package and the next steps in securing funding and beginning on the projects. Then Martinez delves into the statewide race match-ups that were sealed on Tuesday night. She talks with Rick Henderson of Carolina Journal about the dynamics of the fall races, and they discuss the fate of two key North Carolina House leaders who faces serious primary challenges from grassroots activists who were unhappy with House leadership.
 
Last Updated on Tuesday, 22 March 2016 16:28
 
People in Politics March 12, 2016 PDF Print E-mail
People In Politics
Friday, 11 March 2016 06:58

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 

It’s here! Primary Election Day is Tuesday, March 15. All eyes are on North Carolina and our impact on the presidential race, but big races also on the ballot include multiple Council of State races, key legislative primaries, and a $2 billion bond referendum. This week, we offer listeners once last chance to hear the Democratic and Republican primary candidates for the U.S. Senate seat now held by Richard Burr. You’ll  hear from Democrats Kevin Griffin, Ernest Reeves, Chris Rey, and Deborah Ross as they talk with host Donna Martinez about their background and what distinguishes them from their opponents. You’ll also hear comments from Republicans Larry Holmquist and Greg Brannon – two of the four Republicans on the ballot. Richard Burr and Paul Wright did not respond to our request for interviews. Then we turn to the fascinating race to replace outgoing state Treasurer Janet Cowell, a Democrat. We talked with the two Democrats seeking their party’s nomination – Dan Blue III and Ron Elmer – and you’ll hear excerpts from those interviews in which they talk about state spending on investment professionals. And finally, Martinez gets the latest on endorsements and ads in the Democratic primary for Lt. Governor, from Rick Henderson of Carolina Journal. The two also discuss fundraising numbers in the U.S. Senate race, presidential polling numbers in North Carolina, and two key legislative races that could portend the future of House Speaker Tim Moore.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 16 March 2016 16:24
 
People in Politics March 5, 2016 PDF Print E-mail
People In Politics
Thursday, 03 March 2016 17:43

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 

Just 10 days to go and with early voting underway, the candidate endorsements are coming in and the advertisements are going on the air as the politicians craft their final messages to voters. Host Donna Martinez gets the latest campaign trail news from Rick Henderson of Carolina Journal. The two discuss the Winston-Salem Journal endorsement of Democrat Ken Spaulding in the Democratic primary for governor, as well as the TV ad being aired by Democratic Senatorial candidate Deborah Ross. Then Henderson explains why Charlotte’s new public accommodations ordinance might become an issue in the general election campaign for governor. Next is Martinez’ conversation with Jane Pinsky of the North Carolina Coalition for Lobbying and Government Reform. With the state’s congressional districts caught in a legal fight over election fairness, Pinsky is calling for a new push to remove district drawing from state legislators. She tells Martinez how the process is working in Iowa, a state considered to be a leader in redistricting reform. That’s followed by Martinez’s discussion with Ernest Reeves, one of four Democrats seeking the party’s nomination for U.S. Senate. Reeves talks about his qualifications, his view on foreign policy and domestic issues, and why he thinks he is the best Democratic candidate to face the Republican nominee in November. He joins Deborah Ross, Kevin Griffin, and Chris Rey in that quest. On the Republican side, the candidates are incumbent Richard Burr, Larry Holmquist, Paul Wright, and Greg Brannon.

Last Updated on Thursday, 10 March 2016 17:58
 
People in Politics February 27, 2016 PDF Print E-mail
People In Politics
Friday, 26 February 2016 07:06

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 

This week, it’s a game of musical chairs as congressional candidates scramble to determine what to do in light of new district lines submitted to a federal court, along with a delayed primary election date. Host Donna Martinez gets the latest from the campaign trail from Rick Henderson of Carolina Journal. The two discuss the announcement by 13th District Congressman George Holding that he will challenge fellow Republican Congresswoman Renee Ellmers for the 2nd District seat in Congress. New map lines put Holding outside the new 13th District and within several miles of the 2nd. Henderson talks about Ellmers’ reaction, and word that state legislator Andrew Brock of Davie County has thrown his hat into the race for the new 13th District – which was moved about 100 miles west of its current location in the greater Triangle. Then Martinez asks Henderson about the Senate endorsement for Deborah Ross from the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, which typically does not endorse in the primary, and what’s at the heart of a complaint filed with the State Board of Elections by a liberal activist group about ads for the $2 billion bond referendum featuring video of Gov. Pat McCrory. Then Martinez gets the latest presidential polling data from Kenneth Fernandez of the Elon University Poll. He explains that on the Republican side, Trump still leads handily in North Carolina but Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz are on the rise. He also discusses the challenge for Democrat Hillary Clinton, who is leading but still faces a stiff race with Bernie Sanders.

Last Updated on Thursday, 03 March 2016 17:43
 
People in Politics February 20, 2016 PDF Print E-mail
People In Politics
Sunday, 21 February 2016 12:33

 

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 
Courts. Congressional districts. And chaos. This week, legislators gather in a special legislative session called by Gov. Pat McCrory to respond to a federal court order that congressional districts 1 and 12 must be redrawn. And it all happened as legislators awaited word from the U.S. Supreme Court about a potential stay of the court order. Host Donna Martinez gets the latest information available as of press time for this continually developing story from Carolina Journal Managing Editor Rick Henderson. The two discuss the new map created by legislators, which changes the boundaries of congressional districts, and the decision to delay the congressional primary until June 7, with all other primary races staying on March 15. Henderson also explains the legislature’s decision to eliminate primary runoffs due to the pressure on the election schedule. That means whoever gets the most votes – even if they don’t meet the traditional 40 percent threshhold – will win the nomination. The two also discuss the latest polling in North Carolina’s governor’s race, the debate schedule for the U.S. Senate race, and the likelihood of national money flowing into the Senate race. Then Martinez talks with Tom Jensen of Public Policy Polling about new data on the presidential race in North Carolina, which shows Clinton leading handily, Trump still leading, but with Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz rising. And finally, as the presidential election continues to prove conventional wisdom wrong and conventional campaign strategies outdated, we get historical perspective from John Gizzi, chief political correspondent for Newsmax. He made his remarks at a recent luncheon in Raleigh.
Last Updated on Thursday, 25 February 2016 09:28
 
People in Politics February 13, 2016 PDF Print E-mail
People In Politics
Friday, 12 February 2016 07:13

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 
 
This week, suspense and intrigue over the legality of North Carolina’s congressional districts and the possible impact on the state’s March 15 primary election. Host Donna Martinez talks with Rick Henderson of Carolina Journal about the possible outcomes from the U.S. Supreme Court, which is reviewing a request from state officials for a stay of a federal court ruling that says congressional districts 1 and 12 must be redrawn since they were formed using race as a key factor. Henderson analyzes the possibilities in light of the fact that thousands of absentee ballots have already been requested and hundreds of votes already have been cast. The two also discuss the debate over debates in the U.S. Senate race, television ads against 2nd District Congresswoman Renee Ellmers, endorsements in the state Treasurer’s race, and a High Point University poll of the presidential race in North Carolina. Then Martinez talks with Democratic Treasurer candidate Dan Blue III about his run for the seat. Blue tells Martinez how he sees the differences between himself and his Democratic opponent Ron Elmer, as well as his differences with Republican candidate Dale Folwell. Blue explains his approach to managing state pension investments and the state health plan. Then Martinez provides a campaign fundraising update and tells why Vice President Joe Biden was in North Carolina this week.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 08 March 2016 20:56
 
People in Politics February 6, 2016 PDF Print E-mail
People In Politics
Friday, 05 February 2016 06:58

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

The countdown to primary day has begun. With just five weeks until North Carolinians stream to the polls to cast ballots, the race for the U.S. Senate seat nominations has geared up. Host Donna Martinez talks with Democratic candidate Deborah Ross about her run for the party’s nomination, whether or not she will participate in televised debates, her background with the ACLU and her views on national security. Ross has been endorsed by the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee and faces Ernest Reeves, Kevin Griffin, and Chris Rey in the primary. Then we hear from key presidential candidates following the raucous Iowa caucuses. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders wows his supporters following his razor thin  loss to former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, while Clinton revs up her crowd after declaring victory. We also hear from the three key Republican finishers: winner Ted Cruz, senator from Texas, entrepreneur Donald Trump, who faded to second place, and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, who outperformed the polls and rode his strong finish out of Iowa and into New Hampshire. That’s followed by Martinez’ conversation with Catawba College Political Science Professor Michael Bitzer, who offers perspective on Iowa and what’s ahead as the candidates make their way to North Carolina.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 10 February 2016 16:49
 
People in Politics January 30, 2016 PDF Print E-mail
People In Politics
Thursday, 28 January 2016 21:49

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 
 
Six weeks from the primary election, we continue our conversations with the men and women who want to oust Republican Sen. Richard Burr from his U.S. Senate seat. Host Donna Martinez talks with Dr. Greg Brannon about his views on issues and why he believes Republicans should give him the party’s nomination. The two discuss fiscal issues, national security, same-sex marriage, and abortion. Then we turn to campaign fundraising numbers as candidates face the deadline to report their cash hauls to the state. Martinez gets the numbers from Rick Henderson of Carolina Journal, who reports on Roy Cooper, Pat McCrory, Richard Burr, and Deborah Ross. That’s followed by the very latest polling data with Tom Jensen from Public Policy Polling. Jensen and Martinez look at the public’s view of the General Assembly and what it could portend for the November election in which Republicans are seeking to maintain their wide majorities in both chambers. Jensen also discusses the presidential race and the upcoming Iowa caucuses, the Trump trend, and why Hillary Clinton has her eyes set squarely on Nevada and South Carolina rather than Iowa and New Hampshire. And finally, Martinez updates the state’s election calendar with a reminder that absentee balloting by mail has begun.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 10 February 2016 16:48
 
People in Politics January 23, 2016 PDF Print E-mail
People In Politics
Friday, 22 January 2016 09:22

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 
 
 
U.S. Sen. Richard Burr is favored for re-election in polling, but four Democrats, four Republicans, and one Libertarian want to oust the veteran from his seat. This week, host Donna Martinez continues her focus on the Senate primary candidates. She talks with Democrat Kevin Griffin about why he wants the seat, how his background as a Durham businessman impacts his view, his disagreements with Sen. Burr, and his overall view of the role of the government. Griffin’s primary opponents are former Wake County legislator Deborah Ross, Ernest Reeves, and Spring Lake Mayor Chris Rey. Then Martinez turns to the unpredictable race for president and North Carolina’s role as a battleground that could play a key factor in which candidates garner their party’s nomination. Catawba College political science professor Michael Bitzer talks with Martinez about the rise of socialist Bernie Sanders on the Democratic side, and the Donald Trump v. Ted Cruz match-up on the Republican side. He also makes a prediction on the likely nominees, if the election were held today.
Last Updated on Thursday, 04 February 2016 14:03
 
People in Politics January 16, 2016 PDF Print E-mail
People In Politics
Friday, 15 January 2016 06:53

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 
 
With just eight weeks remaining until primary election day, we focus on the wide field in the race for the U.S. Senate – the seat now held by Republican incumbent Richard Burr. Host Donna Martinez is joined by Democrat Chris Rey and by Republican Larry Holmquist to discuss why they want to oust Burr, their views on key issues, and the challenge of winning a statewide contest. Rey, the mayor of Spring Lake, is one of four Democrats seeking his party’s nomination. The others are Deborah Ross, Kevin Griffin, and Ernest Reeves. Holmquist join Burr, Greg Brannon, and Paul Wright on the March 15 primary ballot. Then we turn to two stories that broke during the week. In our weekly “From the Campaign Trail” segment, Carolina Journal Managing Editor Rick Henderson talks with Martinez about a State Bar complaint filed against Attorney General Roy Cooper related to an early campaign for Attorney General, and he explains why the U.S. Department of Energy is looking at a 2009 stimulus grant received by former U.S. Senator Kay Hagan and her family. Finally, Martinez gets an update on why the state NAACP is calling out the Board of Elections for its voter education campaign about the new state requirement to show a photo I.D. to vote.
 
Last Updated on Tuesday, 26 January 2016 13:47
 
People in Politics January 9, 2016 PDF Print E-mail
People In Politics
Friday, 08 January 2016 06:54

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 
 
This week, a bipartisan political powerhouse gathered for the official kickoff of the campaign to convince voters to approve a $2 billion infrastructure bond that will appear on the March 15 primary ballot. You’ll hear Gov. Pat McCrory explain what’s in the bond and the fiscal implications for the state, Republican House Speaker Tim Moore of Cleveland County talk about the bipartisan nature of the bond, and Democratic Senate Minority Leader Dan Blue of Wake County discuss the impact of the projects on distressed areas. But not everyone thinks taking on bond debt is a good idea. While the pro-bond campaign got underway, a group of grassroots conservative activists set up shop online to encourage North Carolinians to vote no. Host Donna Martinez talks to the organizer of the anti-bond campaign, Nicole Revels. The two discuss the petition Revels is spearheading and the uphill battle the activists face in communicating their message statewide. The bond wasn’t the only subject that dominated the week’s political talk. President Obama injected gun control into the presidential race with executive actions that will tighten the rules on who can sell and own a gun. You’ll hear the president’s rebuke of politicians who oppose his move. In North Carolina, the president’s action has already impacted the U.S. Senate race. Martinez gets the details about Democratic Senate candidate Chris Rey’s reaction to the president from Carolina Journal Managing Editor Rick Henderson. The two also discuss the broader implications of gun control on politics and elections, as well as a North Carolina visit from Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio, and a new appointment to the state Board of Elections.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 26 January 2016 13:47
 
People in Politics December 26, 2015 PDF Print E-mail
People In Politics
Tuesday, 05 January 2016 08:24

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

On this Christmas holiday weekend, we take a look at North Carolina's political past and at its political future. You'll  hear host Donna Martinez' recent conversation with former North Carolina Gov. Jim Martin, the first Republican in our state's history to hold the top job for two terms in a state dominated for many decades by Democrats. Martin tells Martinez about his political rise from a Mecklenburg County commissioner to U.S. Congressman and then to governor. They discuss his legacy, his approach to working with Democrats, and his impact on the rise of the GOP in North Carolina, where many of Martin's deputies now hold top positions in state politics and government. After looking at a key player in the state's political history, Martinez charts the 2016 election cycle with Tom Jensen of the Democratic polling firm Public Policy Polling. Jensen delves into his firm's latest data of North Carolina voters, who give incumbent Gov. Pat McCrory the edge over key Democratic rival Roy Cooper, the sitting Attorney General, in a race being watched by the nation. Jensen also discusses the Democratic Party's effort to unseat Republican U.S. Senator Richard Burr, as well as the unusual race for president in a cycle that is very friendly to
outsiders and very unfriendly to experienced politicians.

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 26 January 2016 13:45
 
People in Politics January 2, 2016 PDF Print E-mail
People In Politics
Wednesday, 30 December 2015 10:46

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 
As we say goodbye to 2015, political analysts are eyeing the impact of actions by the Republican majority in the General Assembly on the 2016 election cycle, and the subsequent messaging by state Republicans and Democrats as each party seeks to spin 2015 to their benefit. Host Donna Martinez delves into the tug-of-war and its political implications at the ballot box with Rick Henderson of Carolina Journal. The two also discuss the latest from the campaign trail, where key primary matchups have emerged in legislative seats held by retiring Sens. Tom Apodaca (District 48) and Fletcher Hartsell (District 36) and in House District 36, where Republican incumbent Nelson Dollar has drawn a primary challenger. With roughly one-third of legislative races having only one candidate, Martinez and Henderson talk about whether the lack of competition should be a concern. Then Martinez continues her conversations with candidates seeking to become the state’s next Treasurer. Democratic incumbent Janet Cowell is retiring, leaving Democrats trying to defend the seat and Republicans seeking to gain a seat on the Council of State, where Democrats remain dominant. Martinez has already spoken with Democratic candidate Ron Elmer, who faces fellow Democrat Dan Blue III in the March primary. This week she talks with the lone Republican in the race: former Forsyth County legislator Dale Folwell, who recently resigned his position with the state Department of Commerce. The two discuss why Folwell is running and how his background as a legislator, local school board member, and McCrory administration official may guide him as Treasurer.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 26 January 2016 13:46
 
People in Politics December 19, 2015 PDF Print E-mail
People In Politics
Friday, 18 December 2015 07:00

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 
 
It’s lawsuit time again. Three progressive advocacy groups have filed a lawsuit that claims North Carolina is not properly administering federal law when it comes to giving North Carolinians an opportunity to register to vote. The suit joins the pile of legal actions in the works in the wake of North Carolina’s changes to election law. In this week’s edition of “From the Trail,” host Donna Martinez gets the details of the suit from Carolina Journal Managing Editor Rick Henderson, who says the new allegations could have legs as the state heads into the 2016 election season. The two also discuss Democrat Roy Cooper’s big endorsement from the state’s teacher union in his race to unseat Gov. Pat McCrory. The endorsement from the NCAE comes as the organization is once again under the legislative spotlight. The Lt. Governor’s race is getting crowded, as is the U.S. Senate race. Martinez and Henderson take a look at the group of Democrats vying for the party’s nomination to take on Republican incumbent Dan Forest, and at the field seeking to oust Republican Sen. Richard Burr. Then Martinez talks with Democratic pollster Tom Jensen, director of Public Policy Polling. The group’s latest polling data shows Gov. Pat McCrory up by two over main Democratic rival Roy Cooper. Jensen says the data shows the race continues to be very tight with McCrory having the slight edge. Jensen also delves into new numbers on the presidential race as Republican Donald Trump continues to dominate the GOP field, but with a clear top tier having emerged.
Last Updated on Thursday, 21 January 2016 12:40
 
People in Politics December 12, 2015 PDF Print E-mail
People In Politics
Friday, 11 December 2015 07:07

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 

The national debate over terrorism and gun control comes home to North Carolina. President Obama addressed the nation from the Oval Office Sunday evening, laying out his administration’s efforts to fight ISIS and his view that gun control efforts must be part of the fight. On Monday, Gov. Pat McCrory took to the airwaves to respond to the president, saying he failed to address the role of governors and local officials in the fight and calling on the president for more communication. You’ll hear some of what both men had to say. By Wednesday, the governor was back in the news that put him squarely in the political spotlight when a fellow Republican filed to challenge McCrory in the March primary election. Former Mooresville state legislator Robert Brawley, who lost his bed for re-election in 2014, said he would focus on education and transportation. In our weekly “From the Campaign Trail” segment, host Donna Martinez gets reaction to the GOP challenge to McCrory from Carolina Journal Managing Editor Rick Henderson. The two also discuss what Democratic gubernatorial candidate Roy Cooper had to say about guns and gun control and how terrorism and national security may turn the focus of the race from jobs and the economy to terrorism and guns. The two also discuss congressional politics and the big endorsement given by a national economics group to Jim Duncan, a Republican challenger to incumbent 2nd District Congresswoman Renee Ellmers. In statewide races, Martinez and Henderson focus on the open seat for state Treasurer. As of press time, three candidates had filed for the seat: two Democrats (DanBlue III and Ron Elmer) and 1 Republican (Dale Folwell). Them Martinez goes in-depth with Wake County Democrat Ron Elmer about why he wants the job, his qualifications, and the key changes he would make to the state’s money management strategy.

Last Updated on Thursday, 21 January 2016 12:39
 
People in Politics December 5, 2015 PDF Print E-mail
People In Politics
Friday, 04 December 2015 07:20

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 
It was a huge week in North Carolina politics as candidate announcements and filing rolled in as the official filing period got underway. You’ll hear Gov. Pat McCrory officially declare his intention to seek a second term as the state’s chief executive. So far, McCrory hasn’t drawn a primary challenger. On the Democratic side of the ledger, two candidates are already saying they’re in. You’ll hear part of the official announcement, made several weeks ago, by Attorney General Roy Cooper, as well as part of a conversation host Donna Martinez had earlier this year with Democratic gubernatorial candidate Ken Spaulding. Then, in this week’s edition of “On The Trail,” Martinez gets perspective on the gubernatorial race from Carolina Journal Managing Editor Rick Henderson. He talks about the Cooper-Spaulding matchup as well as the filings so far in the U.S. Senate race where Richard Burr is seeking another term. The two also discuss the announcement made by the NC NAACP about a new push to register voters ahead of the 2016 election and another retirement announcement from a North Carolina Senate heavyweight: Sen. Tom Apodaca. Then Martinez begins a focus on judicial candidate races. She talks with incumbent Court of Appeals Judge Valerie Zachary about why she’s running for a full term on the state’s second highest court. Zachary was appointed earlier this year to the seat of retiring Judge Sanford Steelman. She talks about her background, her philosophy, and the challenge of campaigning for a statewide seat. So far, Zachary and two others have filed for the seat she now holds. Abe Jones and Rickey McKoy-Mitchell are also in the race.
Last Updated on Thursday, 21 January 2016 12:39
 
People in Politics November 28, 2015 PDF Print E-mail
People In Politics
Wednesday, 25 November 2015 09:48

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 

The race for governor takes center stage this week. Democratic Attorney General Roy Cooper tells Gov. Pat McCrory “no” to the governor’s request that the AG join South Carolina in filing a friend of the court brief to oppose the Obama administration’s effort to force a Virginia school system to open opposite-sex bathrooms and locker rooms to a transgendered student. And that wasn’t all. In this week’s installment of “From the Campaign Trail,” host Donna Martinez talks with Carolina Journal Managing Editor Rick Henderson about the Cooper campaign’s retort to the governor, calling him a “bully.” The exchange comes as Cooper’s Democratic rival, former legislator Ken Spaulding, continues to call for debates with Cooper – something the Cooper campaign has yet to agree to. And it comes as a former Republican legislators – Robert Brawley – hints he may jump into the GOP primary for governor. Martinez and Henderson also discuss the resignation of state board of election chairman Josh Howard, the impending kickoff of Lt. Gov. Dan Forest’s re-election effort in a race likely to see him once again face Democrat Linda Coleman, and the latest in the legal battle by Democrats and allied groups to have a court throw out the current election maps. That’s followed by Martinez’ conversation with Alamance County pediatrician Dr. Rosemary Stein, who is seeking the GOP’s nomination for Superintendent of Public Instruction – the post now held by Democrat June Atkinson. Dr. Stein talks about the nexus between her relationship with her patients and their parents, and her desire to help educate young children, as well as the ongoing challenge posed by the high number of recent high school graduates who require remedial courses when enrolling in a North Carolina Community College.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 02 December 2015 17:20
 
People in Politics November 21, 2015 PDF Print E-mail
People In Politics
Friday, 20 November 2015 07:08

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 
Prison bound: Once one of North Carolina’s most potent forces at the General Assembly, Dana Cope is now heading to prison. The former head of the State Employees Association of North Carolina (SEANC) faced Superior Court Judge Donald Stephens this week, telling the judge he is a thief. Cope pleaded guilty to felonies – essentially stealing more than $500,000 from the organization he led for more than a decade. You’ll hear Cope’s words to the judge and what the judge says to him as he sentenced Cope to between five and seven years in prison. Then host Donna Martinez discusses Cope’s lobbying legacy with Carolina Journal Managing Editor Rick Henderson. The two also discuss SEANC’s political involvement through its political arm and how Cope’s prison sentence may impact the role SEANC plays in the 2016 election cycle. Then we turn to the surprise political story of the week: the political debate over whether Syrian refugees should be allowed to continue entering North Carolina. You’ll hear Gov. Pat McCrory discuss his request to President Obama that no more refugees be sent to North Carolina until the backgrounds/vetting of the refugees can be improved to ensure they are, indeed, refugees and are not a threat to safety. The debate comes in the wake of the ISIS terrorist attack on Paris, where law enforcement officials say the terrorist ring leader posed as a refugee to enter Europe.  You’ll also hear North Carolina Congressman Richard Hudson discuss his bill to halt the flow. That’s followed by President Obama’s comments in opposition to the effort to stop the influx of refugees. The president said those who support a pause are afraid of widows and orphans. Also opposing the pause is 4th District Congressman David Price, who explains the vetting process. Then Rick Henderson rejoins Martinez to discuss the refugee debate, which was one of the subjects aired at a legislative committee meeting this week. State lawmakers endorsed the governor’s position. Henderson also provides an update on the committee discussion about a prison maintenance contract held by a donor to the governor and whether or not the contract extension was proper. The two also discuss the latest candidate news, where things are heating up in the 6th and 7th congressional district. New 6th District Rep. Mark Walker is facing a primary challenge, and the same fate could be waiting for 7th District Rep. David Rouzer.
 
Last Updated on Tuesday, 24 November 2015 17:15
 
«StartPrev12345678910NextEnd»

Page 1 of 11
Copyright 2011 - All Rights Reserved
3012 Highwoods Blvd., Suite 200
Raleigh, NC 27604
Telephone: (919) 790-9392