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State Government
State Pesticide Board Announces 21 Case Settlements For Licensing Violations PDF Print E-mail
State Government
By Administrator   
Friday, 20 May 2016 05:01

RALEIGH, (SGRToday.com) - Agreements have been approved by the North Carolina Pesticide Board involving 21 cases of licensing and/or applications violations.

The cases occurred in the counties of Beaufort, Buncombe, Caswell, Craven, Dare, Duplin, Edgecombe, Forsyth, Henderson, Martin, Person, Union, Washington, Wayne and Yadkin counties. Another involved Lafayette, Louisiana.

Penalties were assessed for instances of pesticide drift, sale and purchase of restricted-use pesticides, worker protection violations and for applying pesticides without a valid pesticide license.

Settlements are listed by county below.

Beaufort

Larry M. Lee, owner and operator of Lee Flying Service Inc. in Pantego, agreed to pay $1,000 for drift caused by a pesticide application. N.C. law prohibits depositing pesticide by aircraft on the right-of-way of a public road or within 25 feet of the road, whichever is the greater distance. The law also prohibits applying the pesticide in a manner where it comes in contact with workers or others either directly or through drift.
Buncombe

Joshua Burt, an employee of American Conservation Experience in Fletcher, agreed to pay $1,000 for applying pesticides while having an expired pesticide license and for drift from a pesticide application that damaged plants on a neighboring property. N.C. law states no person should apply pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles or vapors result in adverse effects.
Craven

Claude Eure, an aerial applicator for Eastern Flying Services in Dover, agreed to pay $1,200 for drift from an aerial pesticide application that caused damage to a neighboring property. N.C. law states no person should apply pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles or vapors result in adverse effects.
Dare

Leon Scott Wilkinson, owner and operator of L.P. Landscaping and Maintenance in Kitty Hawk, agreed to pay $800 for applying pesticides without a valid pesticide license. Wilkinson has since renewed his license.
Matthew Ottavio, owner of Carolina Landscaping and Tractor Service in Kitty Hawk, agreed to pay $1,200 for applying a commercial pesticide without a valid pesticide license. Ottavio’s workers applied pesticides at a landscaping site to make the maintenance process easier. He has also been investigated for these allegations in the past.
Duplin

Joe C. Sholar, a licensed pesticide dealer for Sholar Farm Supply in Wallace, agreed to pay $2,200 for seven restricted-use pesticide sales to individuals without valid pesticide licenses. N.C. law requires pesticide dealers to maintain records on all pesticide sales and to sell only to certified or licensed applicators.
In related settlements:

Jamie Leon Craft of Maple Hill agreed to pay $500 for purchasing restricted-use pesticides from Sholar Farm Supply without a valid pesticide license.
Glenwood E. Cavenaugh, owner of Locklin Farms in Wallace, agreed to pay $500 for purchasing restricted-use pesticides from Sholar Farm Supply without a valid pesticide license.
Thomas Ray Rogers of Richlands agreed to pay $200 for purchasing restricted-use pesticides from Sholar Farm Supply without a valid pesticide license.
Edgecombe

Carey F. Carr, manager and licensed pesticide dealer for Parkway Ag Center Inc. in Macclesfield, agreed to pay $2,400 for nine restricted-use pesticide sales that failed to include name, license number and license expiration date. Carr was cited for the same violations in 2013. N.C. law requires pesticide dealers to maintain records on all pesticide sales and to sell only to certified or licensed applicators.
Jeff L. Webb, licensed pesticide dealer and manager of Parkway Ag Center in Tarboro, agreed to pay $3,000 for seven restricted-use pesticide sales that failed to include name, license number and license expiration date. N.C. law requires pesticide dealers to maintain records on all pesticide sales and to sell only to certified or licensed applicators.
Forsyth

Joseph Plitt, of J Landscaping in Pfafftown, agreed to pay $800 for applying pesticides with an expired license. Plitt was warned in 2013 to renew his license and still failed to renew in 2014.
Henderson

Richard D. Baxter, a licensed pesticide dealer for Southern Agricultural Insecticides Inc. in Hendersonville, agreed to pay $1,400 for selling restricted-use pesticides to a customer without a valid pesticide license.
Martin

Thomas E. Lowe, manager and licensed pesticide dealer for Parkway Ag Center Inc. in Williamston, agreed to pay $2,500 for sale of a restricted-use pesticide that failed to include name, license number and license expiration date. N.C. law requires pesticide dealers to maintain records on all pesticide sales and to sell only to certified or licensed applicators.
Person

Lewis D. Winstead III, president of Xtreme Inc. in Roxboro, agreed to pay $1,000 for violations of worker protection standards. An employee at Winstead’s farm claimed he had been exposed to pesticides while topping tobacco, and an inspector observed another employee mixing and loading a tobacco growth regulator without proper personal protective equipment. The inspector noted the following violations: Workers received no training, lacked personal protective equipment, failed to maintain complete pesticide application records, and the farm had no pesticide safety posters or warnings posted.
Union

Paul L. Perala, operator of Southeast Woodland Services in Indian Trail, agreed to pay $2,000 for damage caused to neighboring properties by drift from a right-of-way pesticide application. Perala used pesticides in a manner inconsistent with their labeling by applying near a residential area and operated in a manner that is faulty, careless or negligent. N.C. law states no person should apply pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles or vapors result in adverse effects.
Washington

David P. Hrupsa, an aerial applicator employed by Atlantic Ag Aviation in Roper, agreed to pay $5,600 for drift from an aerial pesticide application that caused damage to a neighboring property. N.C. law states no person should apply pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles or vapors result in adverse effects.
James L. Tucker, an employee and pilot for Atlantic Ag Aviation in Trenton, agreed to pay $900 for damage caused by drift to a wheat field at Tidewater Research Station in Plymouth. N.C. law states no person should apply pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles or vapors result in adverse effects.
Wayne

Christopher S. Gray, owner of Gray’s Turf and Landscape Maintenance in Fremont, agreed to pay $600 for damage caused to trees during a pesticide application. The pesticide label indicated not to use the product near desirable trees or plants, or on areas where their roots might extend.  Gray violated N.C. law by using a pesticide in a manner inconsistent with its labeling.
Yadkin

James W. Cockrell, an aerial applicator and pilot for Air Assault Agricultural Aviation in Jonesville, agreed to pay $1,400 for applying a pesticide in a manner where it comes in contact with workers or others, either directly or through drift. N.C. law states no person should apply pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles or vapors result in adverse effects.
Lafayette, La.

Thomas A. Sartain Jr., an aerial applicator for Industrial Helicopters Inc. in Lafayette, La., agreed to pay $1,400 for drift from a pesticide application to a forestry site in Raeford that contaminated a neighboring property. N.C. law states no person should apply pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles or vapors result in adverse effects.

 
Gov. McCrory Grants Pardon of Innocence to Edward McInnis PDF Print E-mail
State Government
By Administrator   
Friday, 20 May 2016 04:55

RALEIGH, (SGRToday.com) - Edward McInnis served 27 years in prison for a crime he did not commit, and now Gov. Pat McCrory has granted him a Pardon of Innocence.

McInnis was convicted in 1988 of several felony charges and was sentenced to life in prison.  DNA evidence now shows that he was not responsible.

 In August, the District Attorney’s Office for Hoke and Scotland counties filed a Motion for Appropriate Relief based on the newly discovered evidence.  Superior Court Judge Tanya Wallace ordered him to be released.

The governor's office says McCrory met personally with McInnis this week.
 
McInnis is eligible to file a claim under a North Carolina law that allows compensation of up to $750,000 to persons wrongly convicted of felonies. 

 
UNC Pembroke Chancellor Among Four Reappointed To N.C. Institute of Medicine PDF Print E-mail
State Government
By Administrator   
Wednesday, 18 May 2016 05:39

RALEIGH, (SGRToday.com) - Gov. Pat McCrory has reappointed four medical professionals to serve another term on the North Carolina Institute of Medicine board. The board studies health policy matters.

The appointees are:

Kim Schwartz (Halifax County) - Schwartz has served as the chief executive officer of Roanoke Chowan Community Health Center (RCCHC) since June 2005. She has served on various boards and councils, including the Hertford County North Carolina Social Services Board, the Hertford County Emergency Preparedness Council, and the North Carolina Care Share Health Alliance Board.

Dr. Patricia Skinner (Gaston County) - Dr. Skinner is the President of Gaston Community College. During her 17-year tenure, Dr. Skinner has led a significant expansion of Gaston College from one to three campuses, adjusted programs to meet the demands of a changing economy and addressed the educational needs of the communities Gaston College serves.

Dr. Sy Atezaz Saeed (Pitt County) - Since 2004, Dr. Saeed has been serving as the Chairman of the Department of Psychiatric Medicine at the Brody School of Medicine, ECU. He is also the Chief of Psychiatry at the 900+ bed tertiary care academic medical center, Vidant Medical Center. A 1982 medical graduate of Dow Medical College, Dr. Saeed completed his residency training in psychiatry at the Illinois State Psychiatric Institute, Chicago. He is a diplomat of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. He is also certified in Psychiatric Administration and Management by the American Psychiatric Association and holds a M.S. degree in Counseling and Psychotherapy.

Dr. Robin G. Cummings (Robeson County) - Dr. Cummings is a Pembroke native, a cardiothoracic surgeon, and UNC- Pembroke’s sixth chancellor. He previously held the positions of deputy secretary for Health Services and acting health director for the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services. With responsibility for the Division of Medical Assistance, Dr. Cummings was responsible for the health of 1.8 million North Carolinians and a budget of $14 billion. He previously served as the director of the Office of Rural Health and Community Care. Cummings served as medical director for Community Care of the Sandhills (CCS).

 
Audit of North Carolina Cemetery Commission Reveals Misappropriation of Funds PDF Print E-mail
State Government
By Administrator   
Wednesday, 18 May 2016 05:34

RALEIGH, (SGRToday.com) - An audit of the statee Cemetery Commission shows one or more findings, including misappropriation of funds.

Auditor Beth Wood's office released the results of the investigataive audit Tuesday.

According to the report summary:

"The North Carolina Cemetery Commission allowed a former administrative assistant to self-investigate a misappropriation of funds from the Commission. In addition, the Commission failed to follow statutory requirements for reporting the misappropriation to the State Bureau of Investigation. The former administrative assistant admitted to personal purchases of $11,705 and repaid that amount to the Commission."

The audit can be found at .ncauditor.net/EpsWeb/Reports/Investigative/INV-2016-0408.pdf

 
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