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State Government
Governor Names Members To State Boards And Commissions PDF Print E-mail
State Government
By Administrator   
Tuesday, 04 September 2018 08:56
Governor Roy Cooper announced 40 appointments to several state boards and commissions. 
 
“I’m thankful that these accomplished North Carolinians will share their expertise with our state through public service on state boards and commissions,” said Governor Cooper. 
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the Cherokee Preservation Foundation Board of Directors:
•    County Commissioner Danny R. Burns of Bryson City as a member at-large. Burns retired from Pepsi Cola Co. after 43 years of service. He serves on the Swain County Board of Commissioners and previously on the Swain Broadband Committee and Marianna Black Library Planning Committee. 
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individuals to the North Carolina Arts Council:
•    Ann B. Whichard of Greenville as a member at-large. Whichard served on the Board of Directors at the North Carolina Museum of Art as well as the Greenville Museum of Art. She is chair of the Rachel Maxwell Moore Art Foundation. She has served on the UNC General Alumni Association Board of Directors and the Carolina Women’s Leadership Council.
•    Asha Bala of Fayetteville as a member at-large. Bala established the Leela School of Dance. Bala is the 2018 recipient of the North Carolina Heritage Award, and she has performed at venues around the world.
•    Holly Post of Sanford as a member at-large. Post worked in public schools after a career in North Carolina Departments of Natural Resources, Commerce, and Corrections. She served on the Lee County Community Orchestra Board of Directors.
•    Jane Butler Wilson of Winston-Salem as a member at-large. Wilson is the chief executive for various departments at Excalibur Direct Marketing. She served on the Winston-Salem Foundation and the Giannini Advisory Committee of the University of North Carolina School of the Arts. 
•    Kathryn M. Crowe of Morehead City as a member at-large. Crowe is a teacher and serves as the entertainment chair for the Friends of Hospice. Previously, she was the president of the Outer Banks Chapter of the National Charity League. 
•    Sally Plyer of Raleigh as a member at-large. Plyer owns Midtown Art Consulting. She is a board member of the Visual Art Exchange, and served as the Artist Exhibition chair for the Raleigh Fine Arts Society. 
•    Stephen Hill of Kinston as chair.  Hill is CEO and chair of Discovery Insurance Company, Hill Realty, and Mother Earth Brewing.  Previously he served as president of the Community Council for the Arts in Lenoir County and was chair of Arendell Parrot Academy.  
•    Thomas Sayre of Raleigh as a member at-large. He is a founding principal of the multi-disciplinary design firm Clearscapes and has been awarded a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship.  He is a North Carolina Award recipient for Fine Arts. 
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individuals to the North Carolina Auctioneers Commission:
•    Lisa D. York of New Hill as an auctioneer. York is a certified auctioneers institute class advisor at National Auctioneers Association and regional vice president at the NC Association of Realtors. Also, she was awarded the title of 2017 Grand Champion Auctioneer. 
•    Willie A. Johnson of Greensboro as an auctioneer. He is owner/broker of Willie Johnson Realty. He is both a licensed real estate broker and licensed auctioneer.  
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individuals to the North Carolina Board of Certified Public Accountant Examiners:
•    Gary R. Massey of Raleigh as a certified public accountant.  Massey is a principal with CliftonLarsonAllen. He is chair of the Medical Care Advisory Committee. Massey is a past member of the Board of Directors for the Carolinas Center for Hospice and Palliative Care Association. 
•    Michael S. Massey of Morrisville as a certified public accountant. Massey is vice president of Georgia’s Own Credit Union. Massey served on the Board of Directors for the North Carolina Association of CPAs (NCACPA). He is also a member of the American Institute of CPAs (AICPA).
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the Disciplinary Hearing Commission of the North Carolina State Bar:  
•    Jane B.  Weathers of Raleigh as a public member.  Weathers was the director of Section & Division Activities for the North Carolina Bar Association and an elementary school teacher in Wake County.  Weathers is a board member on Wake Up for Children, and the Wake Forest University Alumni Council.  
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the North Carolina Board for Licensing Geologists:  
•    Robert Mensah-Biney of Asheville as a public member. Mensah-Biney works in the Minerals Research Laboratory at North Carolina State University. Mensah-Biney was an adjunct mineral processing professor at UNC-Asheville and as the leader of CAP Consortium.
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individuals to the North Carolina Parks and Recreation Authority: 
•    William N. Lewis of Wilmington as a member knowledgeable about park and recreation issues or finance. Lewis worked as the director of the New Hanover County Parks Department. He is a past president of the NC Recreation and Parks Association. Lewis serves as chair of the North Carolina Parks and Recreation Authority.  
•    Harelda Mavis Gragg of Durham as a member knowledgeable about park and recreation issues or finance. Gragg is an attorney and serves as the chair of Board of Directors for Triangle Land Conservancy and vice chair of the Dispute Settlement Center.
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individuals to the Structural Pest Control Committee:
•    William A. Tesh of Greensboro as a pest control industry member. Tesh is the president of Pest Management Systems, Inc., Groundworks LLC, PestOne Inc., Crawlspace Care Technologies, Inc., and Crawlspace Depot, LLC. Tesh served as president of the National Pest Management Association and president of the NC Pest Control Association.  
•    Akshathumar A. Patel of Cary as a public member. Patel is president for SHRI Hospitality Management Company and principal of SHRI Hotels, LLC. He serves as government relations manager for the Asia American Hotel Owner’s Association and is a past president of The Hindu Society of North Carolina. 
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the North Carolina Commission on Volunteerism and Community Service:
•    Angelo D. Williams of Durham as an expert in delivery of human, educational, environmental, homeland security, or public safety services. Williams is Owner/Art Director of Freshdesignz. Also, he works as the graphic design manager and social media specialist at Saint Augustine’s University.
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individuals to the North Carolina On-Site Wastewater Contractors & Inspectors Certification Board:  
•    Chris Dobbins of Shelby as a water pollution control operator. Dobbins has worked for Wesson Septic Tank Service as Vice President and Construction Project Manager. He is a licensed on-site wastewater systems installer and inspector.
•    Mike Robinson of Kill Devil Hills as a licensed engineer.  Robinson is a licensed surveyor and an engineering and surveying consultant in eastern North Carolina. 
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individuals to the North Carolina Board of Dietetics/Nutrition:  
•    Amanda Holliday of Chapel Hill as a licensed dietician/nutritionist. Holliday is a clinical assistant professor and program director for UNC Chapel Hill. She is a member of the North Carolina Dietetic Association and holds multiple board positions for UNC’s Department of Nutrition and school of Global Public Health.
•    Dr. Ananya Sen of Raleigh as a licensed physician.  Sen works as a medical officer and hospitalist for the Department of Public Safety.  She was the medical director for Rex Family Practice and lab director for Duke Primary Care.    
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the Southern Region Educational Board Legislative Advisory Council:  
•    Senator Jay Chaudhuri of Raleigh as a legislator. Chaudhuri also served as general counsel, senior policy advisor to State Treasurer Cowell, and special counsel to then Attorney General Roy Cooper.  
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the State Education Assistance Authority:
•    Deirdra C. Williams of Youngsville for expertise in Secondary/Higher Education.  Williams works as the dean of Counseling and Student Services at Heritage High School and currently serves on the American School Counselor Association. 
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the North Carolina State Board for General Contractors:  
•    Robin Hicks-Guinn of Charlotte as a public member. Hicks-Guinn is an attorney at the Law Offices of T. Michael Todd, PLLC and a member of the Mecklenburg County Bar Association.  Hicks-Guinn also served as a trial court administrator and was appointed to Raleigh’s Human Relations Committee where she served as chair of the Race Relations Committee.    
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the North Carolina State Board of Examiners for Plumbing, Heating and Fire Sprinkler Contractors:
 
•    Troy A. Worrell of Durham as a heating contractor.  Worrell is the CEO and owner of Carolina Air Conditioning Company Inc. in Durham. Worrell began his career with Towercom Communications where he became the Lead Foreman. Worrell is also an active supporter and participant of the local Habitat for Humanity and Operation Breakthrough. 
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the North Carolina Humanities Council:  
•    Dr. Liliana T. Wendorff of Charlotte as a member at-large.  Wendorff is a Spanish professor and chair of the World Languages Department at Queens University.  Previously, she served as the co-director of StarTalk Chinese Summer Programs and as chair of the Department of Foreign Languages at UNC Pembroke.  
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the Brunswick Community College Board of Trustees:
•    Susan Carroll of Riegelwood as a member at-large. Carroll is a retired licensed physical therapy assistant who worked for Brunswick, New Hanover, and Bladen County schools.  She also serves the Brunswick County Farm Bureau Women’s Committee and the Northwest City Park Activities Board.  
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the Catawba Valley Community College Board of Trustees:
•    John N.  Bray of Hickory as a member at-large.  Bray is the CEO and chairman of Vanguard Furniture Co. Inc. Bray has also served on the Catawba County Chamber of Commerce, Catawba County Champions of Education and the Bank of Granite.
 
Gov. Cooper has reappointed the following individual to the Coastal Carolina Community College Board of Trustees:
•    Nelson E.  Burgess of Jacksonville as a member at-large.  Burgess owns and operates three Chick-fil-A franchises in Jacksonville, NC. Also, he served on the Board of Directors for Branch Banking and Trust, Jones Onslow Electric Membership Corporation, and Onslow County Caring Community Foundation.  
 
 
Gov. Cooper has reappointed the following individual to the College of Albemarle Board of Trustees:
•    Arthur C. Tillett of Nags Head as a member at-large.  Tillett is the assistant superintendent of Dare County Schools.  Tillett was a teacher at Manteo Middle School and an assistant principal at Manteo High School.  
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the Durham Technical Community College Board of Trustees:
 
•    Gracie Johnson-Lopez of Durham as a member at-large.  Johnson-Lopez is the president of Diversity & HR Solutions.  She has served on the Durham Chamber of Commerce, Black Women in Business Advisory Board, and Leadership Triangle.     
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the Forsyth Technical Community College Board of Trustees:
•    Ann Bennett-Phillips of Winston-Salem as a member at-large.  Bennett-Phillips worked as senior vice president with First Citizens Bank and as vice president at CapDev.  She serves on the boards for Forsyth Tech Foundation, Central YMCA of Winston-Salem, NC Center for Public television, and for the NC Public Schools Forum.  
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the Halifax Community College Board of Trustees:
•    Jennifer Locke of Enfield as a member at-large. Locke is a strategic account executive for Duke Energy. She served on the Halifax County Arts Council and the Planning Board for the Town of Enfield, North Carolina.  
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the Pamlico Community College Board of Trustees:
•    Ann Holton of New Bern as a member at-large.  Holton has served as a county commissioner in Pamlico County since 2002.  Holton also served on the NC Association of County Commissioners and with the Pamlico County Partnership for Children.  
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the Richmond Community College Board of Trustees:
•    Dr.  Walter T. Jackson III of Laurinburg as a member at-large.  For over 35 years, Jackson served as a teacher, guidance counselor, principal, and other roles in the Robeson County School system.     
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the Rowan-Cabarrus Community College Board of Trustees:
•    Patricia K. Horton of Concord as a member at-large.  Horton worked as the regional president of Uwharrie Bank and is a former president and CEO of Cabarrus Bank & Trust.  Horton has also served on the Rowan-Cabarrus Foundation Board and the Cabarrus Arts Council.  
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the Wayne Community College Board of Trustees:
•    Brian Geoffrey Hulse of Goldsboro as a member at-large.  Hulse is an attorney and serves on the Boys & Girls Club, Friends of the Wayne County Library, Arts Council of Wayne County, and the Paramount Theatre Foundation.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 04 September 2018 09:24
 
Take Two: Senate Passes New Amendment Proposals PDF Print E-mail
State Government
By Administrator   
Tuesday, 28 August 2018 11:51
 
The North Carolina Senate on Monday, in a bipartisan vote, passed new constitutional amendment proposals that fully comply with the letter and spirit of the three-judge panel’s opinion. The move ensures voters will decide at the ballot box this November whether to enshrine a Nonpartisan Judicial Election Commission to fill judicial vacancies and a Bipartisan Board of Elections and Ethics Enforcement in their constitution.
 
The Senate wrote new amendments in response to a three-judge panel’s ruling on a lawsuit challenging earlier versions. The court offered the General Assembly the option to “act immediately” so the constitutional amendments “may yet appear on the November 2018 general election ballot.” 
 
“While we disagree with the court’s opinion, these amendments are far too important not to be on the ballot, which is why we acted immediately to comply with its decision,” said Senate Leader Phil Berger (R-Rockingham.) “These new amendments address the court’s concerns, and we’re confident voters will agree that a bipartisan elections and ethics board is in the best interest of our state, and that governors should not enjoy unchecked power to appoint their friends and staff to the court.”
 
The ballot question for the Nonpartisan Judicial Election Commission amendment has been updated to provide additional details on the nomination process and eliminate any question of voter confusion. The General Assembly also modified the language to dispense with the unfounded concerns that the amendment could impact the governor’s veto power. 
 
The new Bipartisan Board of Ethics and Election Enforcement amendment differs from the earlier version in that it no longer impacts the appointment process for other boards and commissions. Rather, it solely covers the Bipartisan Board of Elections and Ethics Enforcement. The amendment would form an eight-member board comprised of no more than four appointees from the same party, ensuring that partisan politics does not play a role in oversight of elections and campaign finance.
 
“It’s unfortunate that Gov. Cooper challenged these amendments in the first place, inserting himself into a process that he has no constitutional right to be a part of, but my colleagues and I operated in good faith to address the court’s concerns,” said Sen. Ralph Hise (R-Mitchell), Chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Elections. “The fact of the matter is the people of North Carolina are the ones who should decide what they want in their constitution, and hopefully the governor will abandon further attempts to take away North Carolinians’ right to vote.”
 
The North Carolina House passed the updated proposals last Friday, so they will now appear on the November ballot since they are not subject to a gubernatorial veto. 
 
Cooper Urges General Assembly To Change Law So Confederate Monuments Can Be Moved PDF Print E-mail
State Government
By Administrator   
Wednesday, 22 August 2018 12:37

Statement on Historical Commission Meeting

 

RALEIGH: Governor Roy Cooper shared the following statement in response to the Historical Commission meeting:

 

 

 

 

"It is time for North Carolina to realize that we can document and learn from our history without idolizing painful symbols. The General Assembly needs to change its 2015 law so our state and its people have a better path to remove or relocate these monuments safely, and I urge those who object to the monuments to call on their legislators to change the law and support legislative candidates who want to move our state forward."

 

 

 

 

"The actions that toppled Silent Sam bear witness to the strong feelings many North Carolinians have about Confederate monuments. I don’t agree with or condone the way that monument came down, but protesters concluded that their leaders would not – could not—act on the frustration and pain it caused. I acknowledge, too, those who believe these monuments should stay as they are because they symbolize our history. But they are just one part of our history. North Carolina is welcoming to all, and our most prominent public places should reflect that."

 
"Sunny Days" Projected For NC Economy PDF Print E-mail
State Government
By Administrator   
Friday, 17 August 2018 09:38
By Dr. Michael Walden 

William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor

North Carolina State University 

 
The national economy is always a key driver of state economies. Although there are many questions and issues related to the national economy – trade negotiations, the Federal Reserve’s interest rate policies, international tensions, and the future composition of the Congress – most economists do see continued economic growth for the remainder of 2018 and in to 2019. The consensus seems to be a recession – if it occurs – will not arrive until 2020.
 
I forecast North Carolina real GDP will increase by 3.2% in 2018 and by 3.4% in 2019. Payroll job growth will be 1.7% in both 2018 and 2019, resulting in approximately 75,000 net new jobs in each of the years.
 
Predicting the most-used unemployment rate – the “headline rate” - is difficult. The rate will drop as more jobs are added and nothing else changes. But if some individuals who had left the labor force because they could not find work – and therefore are not officially counted as unemployed – resume looking for work as labor market conditions improve, the jobless rate can remain the same, or even rise, as jobs increase.
 
The “headline” unemployment rate is challenging to predict because it is based on more than simply job growth. Also important are the number of new individuals moving to the state, the number of people choosing to be in the labor force, and the number who actively seek work. Still, with labor market conditions expected to improve for both the rest of 2018 as well as 2019, I anticipate a year-end “headline” jobless rate in North Carolina of 4.1% at the end of 2018 and 3.8% at the end of 2019.
 
Asheville, Durham, and Raleigh are predicted to have the lowest end-of-year jobless rates in 2019, at between 3% and 3.5%. Fayetteville, Rocky Mount, and Greenville will have the highest rates.
 
With economic growth continuing over the next 18 months, the economic geographic divide should continue to lessen somewhat, as firms search for more economic opportunities and labor availability outside of the large metropolitan regions. The status of the economic occupational divide will depend importantly on advances in technology. There have been significant gains in middle-paying construction and manufacturing jobs in recent years. Much of this is tied to rebounds in economic activity in those sectors. But both job categories – especially manufacturing – are susceptible to technology substituting for labor. This potential will largely determine the workforce trends in middle-paying occupations.
 
In terms of the signs to follow for an on-coming recession, it’s always advisable to look for emerging “excesses” in the economy that are prone for reversing. Currently it appears the sectors to watch are equity investments (the stock markets), where many indicators suggest inflated values, and business borrowing, where higher-risk loans have been increasing. Signs of trouble in either of these areas may be the best forecast of a broad economic downturn.
 
But for now, there appear to be sunny days in the near future for the economy, both nationally and in North Carolina.
 
TEN NORTH CAROLINA ECONOMIC HEADLINES FOR 2018 AND 2019

 

1. The broadest measure of economic output – real Gross State Product – increased faster in North Carolina than in the nation in 2017 and is on track to do the same in 2018.
 
2. From the first quarter of 2017 to the first quarter of 2018, the top five expanding economic sectors in North Carolina were durable manufacturing, education services, nondurable manufacturing, information, and clerical services.
 
3. The growth rate in residential building permits in North Carolina in 2018 is on track to be lower than the growth rate in 2017.
 
4. Payroll employment growth in North Carolina is expected to exceed national payroll employment growth in 2018.
 
5. The broadest measure of unemployment – the “U6” rate which includes discouraged workers and part-time workers wanting full-time work – was lower in North Carolina than the national rate in 2017 and continues to be lower than the national rate in 2018.
 
6. Average wage rates adjusted for inflation have been stagnant in both North Carolina and the nation in 2017 and 2018. However, since 2014 North Carolina’s average wage rate has moved closer to the national average rate.
 
7. The economic occupational divide narrowed in North Carolina in 2017 and thus far in 2018 as a result of much stronger growth in middle-paying jobs in both years.
 
8. Similarly, the economic geographic divide improved in 2017 and in the first half of 2018 as more robust job growth occurred in small metros and rural areas.
 
9. North Carolina real Gross State Product is forecasted to increase 3.2% in 2018 and 3.4% in 2019.
 
10. The end-of-the-year “headline” unemployment rate in the state is projected to be 4.1% in 2018 and 3.8% in 2019, with 75,000 payroll jobs added in each of the years.
 
 
 
Last Updated on Friday, 17 August 2018 09:44
 
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