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State Government
The Cardinal at North Hills Seeks Approval for 51 Additional Adult Care Home Beds PDF Print E-mail
State Government
By Donna Martinez   
Wednesday, 23 May 2018 12:29
The Cardinal at North Hills has filed a certificate of need application with the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services seeking approval to add 51 adult care home beds to its healthcare facility located in Raleigh.   
 
The Cardinal at North Hills, which is currently approved for 55 adult care home beds and 15 nursing care beds, proposes to add 51 adult care beds on the campus of the existing facility. The project is expected to cost $25.5 million and would be completed in January 2021.
 
A public hearing for the project will be held June 19 at 11 a.m. in the Edgerton Building, Dorothea Dix Campus, 809 Ruggles Drive, Room 026 in Raleigh.
 
Anyone may file written comments concerning these proposals. Comments must be received by the Healthcare Planning and Certificate of Need Section no later than 5:30 p.m. on May 31.
 
Comments may be submitted as an attachment to an email and sent to
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Comments may also be mailed to the following address:
 
          Healthcare Planning and Certificate of Need Section
          Division of Health Service Regulation
          2704 Mail Service Center
          Raleigh, NC 27699-2704
 
For more information please contact:
 
          Mike McKillip, Project Analyst
          Healthcare Planning and Certificate of Need Section
          (919) 855-3873
          This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it   
 
 
 
Legislative Leaders Promise Fifth Consecutive Teacher Pay Raise PDF Print E-mail
State Government
By Administrator   
Wednesday, 23 May 2018 12:21
Raleigh, N.C. – North Carolina House Speaker Tim Moore (R-Cleveland) and Senate Leader Phil Berger (R-Rockingham) affirmed legislative Republicans’ commitment to providing North Carolina public school teachers a fifth consecutive pay raise as part of the legislative short session slated to begin on Wednesday, May 16.
 
Moore and Berger said teachers should expect to see an average 6.2 percent pay raise in the 2018-19 school year alone. Under the current 2017-19 state budget, teachers are scheduled to receive an average $4,412 raise, after lawmakers overrode Gov. Roy Cooper’s veto last year. And unlike a recent proposal from the governor, lawmakers will pay for the raises without a tax hike.
 
The leaders also unveiled a transparent new tool at www.ncteacherraise.com designed to help teachers, parents and the public understand the total increase to base teacher pay since 2014 under Republican leadership.
 
 According to the General Assembly’s nonpartisan Fiscal Research Division, the average teacher salary for the 2018-19 school year will be roughly $53,600. That’s an average $8,600 – or 19 percent – pay raise compared to the 2013-14 school year. At www.ncteacherraise.com, teachers can view the increase to their individual base pay over the same period by entering their current number of years in the classroom. The base pay figures do not include any benefits, state or local supplements or bonuses.
 
“After taking over from Democratic leadership that furloughed teachers and froze their salaries, Republicans in the General Assembly made a promise to dramatically raise teacher pay in North Carolina – and we’ve kept our promise,” said Berger and Moore. “Despite the lack of information in the media and the politically-motivated misinformation coming from the local affiliate of the national teachers’ union, the numbers speak for themselves – and we’re glad to have the opportunity to share North Carolina’s success story and set the record straight.”  
 
The substantial increases also add up to far higher lifetime earnings. Under the pay plan put in place by Republicans, a teacher will earn $233,000 more in base pay alone over a 30-year career than he or she would have earned under the Democrats’ old plan.
 
Key Facts on Teacher Pay in North Carolina
 
•         In 2018, North Carolina public school teachers will receive a fifth consecutive pay raise. 
•         The average teacher pay raise from 2017-19 will be $4,412, a 9.5 percent increase.
•         The average teacher pay raise from 2014-2019 will be $8,600, a 19.1 percent increase.
•         North Carolina ranked #2 in the U.S. for fastest rising teacher pay in 2018 according to the National Education Association. 
•         A teacher with five years of experience will earn $9,200 more in 2018-19 than the same teacher in 2013-14, from $30,800 to $40,000, a 29.9 percent increase. 
•         A teacher with twelve years of experience will earn $15,330 more in 2018-19 than that teacher did in 2013-14, from $31,670 to $47,000, a 48 percent increase. 
•         A teacher with sixteen years of experience will earn $11,840 more in 2018-19 than the same teacher did in 2013-14, from $38,160 to $50,000, a 31 percent increase. 
•         A teacher with twenty-five years of experience will earn $9,040 more in 2018-19 than they did in 2013-14, from $42,260 to $51,300, a 21.4 percent increase. 
 
•         Other bonus programs, compensation incentives and support for North Carolina teachers include:
 
o   Teacher Assistant Tuition Reimbursement
o   Initial Teacher Licensing Fee Reimbursement
o   Future Teachers of North Carolina
o   Supplements for Highly Qualified Graduates
o   Advanced Teaching Roles Pilot Program
o   New Teacher Support Program 
o   Highly qualified Teacher Salary Supplements 
o   3rd Grade Reading Bonuses 
o   AP/IB/CTE Bonuses 
o   4th-8th Reading/Math Bonuses
o   Veteran teacher bonuses 
o   New Teaching Fellows Program
 
 
Governor Makes Judicial Appointments PDF Print E-mail
State Government
By Administrator   
Wednesday, 23 May 2018 11:50
Governor Roy Cooper announced six new judicial appointments. 
 
Superior Court
 
Gov. Cooper appointed William Wood as a Superior Court Judge in District 18D, serving Guilford County. He replaces Judge Lindsay Davis, who retired earlier this year. Wood has served as an Assistant District Attorney in the Guilford County District Attorney’s Office for nearly thirty years, where he has specialized in prosecuting violent crimes. He holds degrees from Lenoir-Rhyne University and North Carolina Central School of Law. 
 
District Court
 
Gov. Cooper appointed Keith Mason as a District Court Judge in District 2, serving, Beaufort, Hyde, Martin, Tyrrell, and Washington Counties. He replaces Chief District Court Judge Michael Paul, who retired earlier this year. Mason has served as an attorney in private practice for over 25 years. He also formerly served as an Assistant District Attorney in Judicial District 2. He holds undergraduate and law degrees from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
 
 
Gov. Cooper appointed Sophia Gatewood Crawford as a District Court Judge in District 16A, serving Anson, Richmond, Scotland and Hoke Counties. She replaces Judge Lisa Thacker, who retired earlier this year.Crawford has served as a trial attorney in private practice for 17 years. She previously served as a Senior Assistant District Attorney in the 20th District. She holds degrees from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Wake Forest University School of Law. 
 
Gov. Cooper appointed Marcus Shields as a District Court Judge in District 18, serving Guilford County. He replaces Judge Avery Crump, who retired earlier this year.Shields has served as an attorney in private practice, as an attorney for North Carolina Prisoner Legal Services, and as an Assistant Public Defender in the 18th Judicial District. He has also served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Elon University School of Law. He holds degrees from the University of South Carolina at Columbia and North Carolina Central School of Law.
 
Gov. Cooper appointed Faith Fickling as a District Court Judge in District 26, serving Mecklenburg County. She replaces Judge Donnie Hoover. Fickling has served as an attorney at Legal Aid of North Carolina for nearly 12 years and previously served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Madagascar. She holds degrees from American University and Syracuse University School of Law. 
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed Roy Wiggins as a District Court Judge in District 26, serving Mecklenburg County. He replaces Judge Karen Eady-Williams. Wiggins has served as an attorney in private practice for over 20 years. He previously served as an Assistant District Attorney in Judicial District 26. He holds degrees from East Carolina University and Campbell University School of Law. 
 
 
Cooper Pans Legislature's Teacher Pay Proposals PDF Print E-mail
State Government
By Administrator   
Wednesday, 23 May 2018 11:40

Noelle Talley, Deputy Communications Director for Governor Roy Cooper, shared the following statement on the North Carolina General Assembly's teacher pay proposal:

“Instead of prioritizing tax cuts for corporations and those earning more than $200,000, legislators should give real raises to all teachers. Making education the top priority means more textbooks and classrooms, not more tax cuts for those already at the top.”

Gov. Cooper's budget proposes an average 8% teacher pay raise this year, with every teacher receiving at least a 5% raise.

This includes veteran teachers who are left behind by the legislature’s teacher pay plan. The budget pays for the teacher raise by targeting the scheduled income tax cuts to the middle class, freezing additional tax breaks for income over $200,000 a year and corporations.

The budget puts North Carolina on track to reach the national average in teacher pay in four years and to be a Top Ten Educated State by 2025 by adding 2,000 pre-K slots, proposing $25 million for textbooks and digital learning and providing educators a $150 stipend to cover out-of-pocket classroom supplies.

It authorizes $75 million to start a fix to the class size chaos caused by the General Assembly’s unfunded class size mandates. The budget leaves room for a school construction bond of up to $2 billion that Governor Cooper believes the legislature should ask voters to pass in 2018.

The budget also includes $130 million to hire more student support personnel in schools, like School Resource Officers, nurses and counselors, and to upgrade facilities to be more secure.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 23 May 2018 11:41
 
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