Federal Government
Charlotte Gang Leader Sentenced To 20 Years in Federal Prison For Racketeering PDF Print E-mail
Federal Government
By Administrator   
Friday, 07 August 2020 10:47
A Charlotte man was sentenced today to 240 months in prison for Conspiracy to Participate in a Pattern of Racketeering (RICO conspiracy).  
On July 22, 2019, Demetrius Deshaun Toney, 28, pled guilty to RICO conspiracy.  According to court documents and evidence presented during the trial of the co-defendants, Toney, was a member of the Black Mob Gangstas (BMG) organization led by Demetrice R. Devine, which later became the Donald Gee Family (DGF).  Devine also led the Gangsta Killer Bloods (GKB). The BMG/DGF are sets of the “Bloods” gang whose members committed various crimes in the city of Raleigh and especially in the area of Haywood Street.     
 
BMG/DGF members committed acts of violence to maintain membership and discipline, both within the gang and against non-gang members.  Members committed acts of violence, including murder, attempted murder, and assaults, in order to maintain their positions within the gang and to be promoted within the leadership structure of the gang.
 
BMG/DGF, including its leadership, members and associates, constituted an “enterprise” as defined by Title 18, United States Code, Section 1961(4), that is, a group of individuals’ associated-in-fact. The enterprise constituted an ongoing organization, whose members functioned as a continuing unit for a common purpose of achieving the objectives of the enterprise. The enterprise was engaged in, and its activities affected, interstate and foreign commerce.  The purpose of the BMG/DGF enterprise included the following:
 
a.         Preserving and protecting the power, territory, reputation, respect, and profits of the enterprise through the use of intimidation, violence, threats of violence, assaults, murder and attempted murder;
 
b.         Promoting and enhancing the enterprise and its members’ and associates’ activities, including, but not limited to, murders, attempted murders, robberies, drug distribution and other criminal activities;
 
c.         Keeping the community and rivals in fear of the enterprise and its members and associates through violence and threats of violence;
 
d.         Providing financial support and information to gang members, including those incarcerated in the United States;
 
e.         Providing assistance to other gang members who committed crimes for and on behalf of the gang; and,
 
f.          Hindering, obstructing, and preventing law enforcement officers from identifying, apprehending, and successfully prosecuting and punishing members of the enterprise.
 
BMG/DGF also held gang meetings to communicate gang information, to recruit members, issue punishment and collect gang dues from each BMG/DGF member for the benefit of the BMG/DGF organization.  A portion of the dues were saved and utilized locally in what was referred to as a “community rent box” (CRB) while another portion was sent up the chain of command to gang leadership in Virginia and New York.  BMG/DGF members were permitted to earn their money for dues through various methods, including, but not limited to, robberies, fraud schemes, and drug distribution.  The monies were used locally for loans to gang members, for drug purchases, for firearm purchases, for gifts, and cellular telephones for high-ranking members who were in jail.  Devine ordered that individuals selling narcotics in and around Haywood Street who were not BMG/DGF members were also required to pay gang dues in order to continue their drug sales in territory controlled by BMG/DGF.  Individuals who did not pay gang dues risked being robbed, assaulted, or murdered. 
 
Toney along with other gang members conspired to shoot an 18-year-old rival gang member, Rodriguez Burrell, because Burrell refused to pay money to BMG/DGF.  Burrell was shot multiple times in the presence of his father and died of his wounds.
 
In his leadership position, Devine directed members of his gang to shoot a 16-year-old rival gang member, Adarius Fowler, who died from gunshot wounds.  He also ordered a gang member to shoot a person who provided information to law enforcement regarding the murder of Fowler.  While this person was recovering from those gunshot injuries in the hospital, Devine ordered that the person be killed.  Devine presided over a “beat-in” gang initiation of a BMG/DGF gang member and personally assaulted another gang member whose loyalty he questioned.  Devine conspired with other gang members to silence and threaten gang members that had been provided subpoenas to testify in a federal proceeding.
 
Toney also sold drugs on behalf of BMG/ DGF.  Toney’s sentencing was the final sentencing of a BMG/DGF gang member in a lengthy investigation as a part of an Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Force Operation (OCDETF) targeting violent gang members and drug traffickers in Raleigh, North Carolina.   
 
BMG/DGF’s leader, Demetrice Devine, also known as “Respect,” was convicted by a jury of RICO conspiracy, murder in aid of racketeering, murder with a firearm during and in relation to a crime of violence, conspiracy to distribute controlled substances, and conspiracy to commit witness tampering.  Devine was sentenced on May 22, 2020 to four consecutive life sentences, followed by 240 months imprisonment.  Brandon Mangum, also known as “B Easy,” a high-ranking gang member, was convicted by a jury of RICO conspiracy, murder in aid of racketeering, murder with a firearm during and in relation to a crime of violence, and conspiracy to distribute controlled substances.  Mangum was sentenced on June 22, 2020 to three consecutive life sentences followed by 240 months imprisonment.  Jamario Keon Jones, also known as “Spect Junior” and “Skeeno,” was sentenced on February 6, 2020 to 132 months imprisonment for murder with a firearm during and in relation to a crime of violence.  Cleveland McNair, also known as “Blee,” was sentenced on May 8, 2018 to 60 months imprisonment for RICO conspiracy and conspiracy to distribute controlled substances.  Christopher Darnell Evans, also known as “Racks” and “Snacks,” was sentenced on December 13, 2017 to 120 months imprisonment for RICO conspiracy and conspiracy to distribute controlled substances.  Brenda Joyce Brown, also known as “Lady Banga,” was sentenced on January 16, 2018 to 42 months imprisonment for violent crime in aid of racketeering.  Katherine Victoria Gast, also known as “Kat Stacks,” was sentenced on June 1, 2018 to 60 months imprisonment for violent crime in aid of racketeering.  Finally, Shaiona Marie Smith, also known as “Slyfox,” was sentenced on January 19, 2018 to 78 months imprisonment for violent crime in aid of racketeering.
 
Robert J. Higdon, Jr., U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of North Carolina made the announcement after sentencing by U.S. District Judge James C. Dever III. The Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Raleigh Police Department led the investigation with assistance from the North Carolina Department of Public Safety, Wake County Sheriff’s Office, Raleigh/ Wake City-County Bureau of Identification, United States Marshal’s Service, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, and the North Carolina Office of the Chief Medical Examiner.   Assistant United States Attorneys Dena King and Scott Lemmon prosecuted this case with Christina Taylor with the U.S. Department of Justice Criminal Division’s Organized Crime and Gang Section.  
 
 
Raleigh Man Sentenced To 22 Years On Federal Drug Charges PDF Print E-mail
Federal Government
By Donna Martinez   
Thursday, 06 August 2020 10:08
A Raleigh man was sentenced today to 264 months in prison for possession with intent to distribute crack cocaine and threatening a federal officer.
According to court documents, Khalil Jordan, 24, was observed engaging in hand-to-hand drug sales within 1,000 feet of Carver Park in Raleigh, North Carolina.
 
Officers attempted to search Jordan’s person but he was uncooperative. Jordan told officers that he would kick them and make a scene so that the neighbors could attack the officers. While being led to the patrol vehicle, Jordan tried to break free. As a result, three Raleigh Police Department (RPD) officers were needed to place Jordan in the patrol vehicle and two officers rode in the back of the vehicle with him to prevent further resistive conduct. A strip search at the police station revealed Jordan had 3.6 grams of cocaine base in individually wrapped packages concealed between his buttocks.
 
At the police station, RPD officers, including a task force officer with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), were completing Jordan’s arrest paperwork when Jordan, unprovoked, stated to an RPD officer and ATF Task Force Officer, “If I ever see you again I will shoot you in the face.” Jordan then stated that he was a great shot and would shoot every officer in the room. Jordan further stated that the “next cop who jumps out on me better have their little pistol ready because I am going to kill them.” Jordan spat on an officer while being placed into a holding cell. Jordan told the officer taking his fingerprints that he would “smoke” her, meaning kill her, if he saw her on the streets.
 
This case is also part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), a program bringing together all levels of law enforcement and the communities they serve to reduce violent crime and make our neighborhoods safer for everyone.  The United States Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of North Carolina implements the PSN Program through its Take Back North Carolina Initiative.  This initiative emphasizes the regional assignment of federal prosecutors to work with law enforcement and District Attorney’s Offices on a sustained basis in those communities to reduce the violent crime rate, drug trafficking, and crimes against law enforcement.
 
Robert J. Higdon, Jr., U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of North Carolina made the announcement after sentencing by U.S. District Judge James C. Dever III. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives and the Raleigh Police Department investigated the case and Assistant U.S. Attorney Tom Crosby  prosecuted the case.
 
 
Mexican Cocaine Trafficking Leader Pleads Guilty: Faces At Least 10 Years In Federal Prison PDF Print E-mail
Federal Government
By Administrator   
Thursday, 06 August 2020 09:52
A Mexican national pleaded guilty Thursday to two offenses: conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute five kilograms or more of cocaine (Count One); and possession with intent to distribute five kilograms or more of cocaine, and aiding and abetting (Count Two).
 
According to court documents and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Bernave Millan-Rascon, also known as “Berna,” 40 years old, was one of two leaders of an international cocaine trafficking organization based in Mexico. Millan-Rascon directed the shipment of multi-kilogram quantities of cocaine from Mexico into Texas, and then into other parts of the United States, including the Eastern District of North Carolina. 
 
Agents conducted a wiretap investigation and seized 16 kilograms of cocaine, $173,100, and two firearms in Benson, North Carolina and Willow Spring, North Carolina. During the wiretap, agents recorded phone calls in which the Defendant directed the shipment of large amounts of cocaine into North Carolina. 
 
The Defendant was extradited from Colombia, South America for prosecution in the Eastern District of North Carolina. Millan-Rascon faces no less than ten years' imprisonment, and a maximum of life imprisonment, when he is sentenced during the court’s November 2020 term. 
 
Three co-conspirators have previously been convicted and sentenced: Carlos Miranda Lopez (120 months’ imprisonment); Francisco Javier Rascon-Millan (12 months and 1 day imprisonment); and Malcolm Jamar Hird (120 months’ imprisonment). 
 
Robert J. Higdon, Jr., U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of North Carolina, made the announcement after Chief United States District Judge Terrence W. Boyle accepted the plea. The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), the Wilson Police Department, the Raleigh Police Department, the Rocky Mount Police Department, the Nash County Sheriff’s Office, and the Wayne County Sheriff’s Office assisted in this investigation.  Assistant U.S. Attorney Scott A. Lemmon is prosecuting the case.
 
Rep. Foxx Pushes For Bolstered Oversight of Coronavirus Relief Efforts PDF Print E-mail
Federal Government
By Administrator   
Wednesday, 05 August 2020 09:48
House Education and Labor Committee Republican Leader Virginia Foxx (R-NC) and House Oversight Committee Republican Leader James Comer (R-KY), released the following statement on the introduction of the Pandemic Preparedness, Response and Rapid Recovery Act.
 
“COVID-19 has laid siege to the United States and has uncovered a litany of burdensome regulations that only exacerbate the problems that we face on multiple fronts. At such a pivotal moment for our country, it’s imperative that we identify areas where we can cut bureaucratic red tape that hampers the recovery from the health and economic effects of COVID-19 and future pandemics,” said Representative Foxx. “I’m proud to have introduced this critical legislation that would create a commission to review the regulatory obstacles to preparedness for, response to, and rapid recovery from the Coronavirus pandemic and future pandemics.”
 
“At a time when businesses are working to reopen and our economy is in need of a boost, it is critical that we remove regulatory barriers to a recovery,” said Representative Comer. “Government spending cannot be the only solution to this crisis – especially as the national debt races past $26 trillion. Congress must put partisanship aside and act boldly to reform government regulations in a way that empowers business growth and a return to a healthy workforce.”
 
BACKGROUND: The Pandemic Preparedness, Response and Rapid Recovery Act  establishes a fast moving, BRAC-style commission to help Congress quickly identify and repeal regulations that have stood in the way, or stand in the way, of preparedness for, response to, or rapid recovery from the Coronavirus pandemic or a future pandemic – while still preserving necessary protections.
 
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