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Federal Government
Corrections Officer Sentenced To Federal Prison For Accepting Bribe PDF Print E-mail
Federal Government
By Administrator   
Wednesday, 27 March 2019 14:06
United States District Judge James C. Dever III sentenced Arlinda Hendrix Lee 47, of Windsor, North Carolina, to 12 months and 1 day in prison, followed by 1 year of supervised release after an investigation revealed that as a correctional officer at Rivers Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) in Winton, North Carolina, was accepting bribes and helping to smuggle contraband into the prison for inmates.
 
On July 23, 2018, Lee pleaded guilty to a Criminal Information that charged her with Receipt of Bribes by a Public Official from 2015 to January 27, 2017.
In December 2015, investigators became aware that an inmate at Rivers FCI was using contraband cell phones to facilitate the smuggling of contraband cigarettes and drugs into the prison, as well as to communicate with drug associates. A review of telephone records from September 22, 2015 through March 28, 2016 revealed that the inmate had 53 contacts with phone numbers associated with Lee. The inmate ater obtained a new cell phone, and phone records revealed five additional contacts with Lee.
 
Investigators determined that between May 10, 2012, and August 18, 2016, LEE received $7,350 in wire transfers from known associates of Rivers FCI inmates in exchange for helping to smuggle contraband into the prison.
 
Investigation of this case was conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Bureau of Prisons Office of Inspector General. The case was prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Scott A. Lemmon.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 27 March 2019 14:09
 
James C. Fox, Federal Judge For 35 Years, Dies PDF Print E-mail
Federal Government
By Administrator   
Wednesday, 27 March 2019 12:37
Robert J. Higdon, Jr., United States Attorney for the Eastern District of North Carolina, issued the following statement upon the passing of Judge James C. Fox:
 
“It is with a heavy heart that the men and women of the United States Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District acknowledge the death of former United States District Judge James C. Fox."
 
Judge Fox, a graduate of the University of North Carolina and the UNC School of Law, was appointed as a United States District Judge for the Eastern District in 1982 by President Ronald Regan. He served more than 35 years on the bench, until his retirement in 2017.
 
Over the years of his service on the bench, federal prosecutors in this district knew Judge Fox to be a keen student of the law, and dedicated to its firm and fair enforcement. He expected the highest standards of ethics and professionalism in his court and any attorney who appeared before him was the better for the experience. He deeply loved the people and places in the Eastern District and worked hard to ensure their business was well-handled in federal court. He will be greatly missed.
 
Our deepest respect and gratitude go to Judge Fox. And, we will keep Judge Fox’s family in our thoughts and prayers.”
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Last Updated on Wednesday, 27 March 2019 12:39
 
Wilmington Fentanyl Dealer Gets 17 Years In Federal Prison PDF Print E-mail
Federal Government
By Administrator   
Wednesday, 27 March 2019 11:50
Chief United States District Judge Terrence W. Boyle sentenced ShawqiGray, 37, of Wilmington to 204 months imprisonment, followed by 5 years of supervised release.
 
On November 6, 2018, GRAY plead guilty to possession with the intent to distribute 100 grams or more of heroin and a quantity of fentanyl and possession of a firearm in furtherance of drug trafficking crime.
 
On November 30, 2017, the New Hanovery County Sheriff’s Office conducted a search of GRAY’s residence and a storage container on the property. Law enforcement found the following items: more than 150 grams of a mixture of heroin and fentanyl, more than 150 grams of a mixture of heroin and ketamine, 5 handguns (two of which were stolen) and more than $47,000 in cash. The investigation uncovered that GRAY had been involved in the distribution of more than a kilogram and half of a mixture of heroin and fentanyl from July until November 2017.
 
On August 4, 2016, the Easton, Pennsylvania Police searched GRAY’S residence. Gray was not present. Law enforcement found 20 grams of heroin, 68 grams of crack cocaine and more than $19,000 in cash.
 
This case is part of an FBI lead OCDETF operation “Tooth Fairy”. This is part of an extensive investigation by the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF). This investigation is focused on the distribution of heroin from New Jersey to New Hanover, Brunswick, Bladen, Duplin, and Sampson Counties and associated gang activities.
 
This case is also part of the Take Back North Carolina Initiative of The United States Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of North Carolina. This initiative emphasizes the regional assignment of federal prosecutors to work with law enforcement and District Attorney’s Offices on a sustained basis in those communities to reduce the violent crime rate, drug trafficking, and crimes against law enforcement.
 
The investigation of this case was conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation Coastal Carolina Criminal Enterprise Task Force, The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, & Explosives, New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office and the Easton, Pennsylvania Police Department. Assistant United States Attorney Timothy Severo prosecuted the case on behalf of the government.
 
Wilmington Gang Leader Sentenced To 20 Years In Federal Prison PDF Print E-mail
Federal Government
By Administrator   
Wednesday, 27 March 2019 11:43
United States District Judge James C. Dever, III, sentenced Victor Eugene Dorm, 30, of Wilmington to 240 months’ imprisonment, followed by 5 years of supervised release.
 
On November 14, 2018, Dorm pled guilty to five counts: conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute a quantity of cocaine and 28 grams or more of crack cocaine; distribution of a quantity of heroin; manufacture, distribution, and possession with intent to distribute 28 grams or more of cocaine base; use and carry a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime; and possession of a firearm by a convicted felon.
 
DORM was the fourth of six co-defendants to be sentenced in this case. Three men have received sentences ranging from 60 to 204 months:
 
• On May 23, 2018, Eugene Telphia Grady, Jr., was sentenced to 60 months’ imprisonment and 6 years of supervised release, following his guilty plea to a charge of conspiring to distribute crack cocaine.
 
• On October 3, 2018, James Flowers was sentenced to 120 months’ imprisonment and 5 years of supervised release, following a guilty plea
to conspiring to manufacture, distribute and possess cocaine and 28 grams of more of crack cocaine; manufacture, distribution, and possession with intent to distribute 28 grams or more of crack cocaine; and use and carry a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.
 
• Also on October 3, 2018, Sylvester Lorenzo Hooper, Jr., was sentenced to 204 months’ imprisonment and 8 years of supervised release, following his guilty plea to conspiring to distribute 28 grams or more of crack cocaine; possession of a firearm by a convicted felon; and distribution of a quantity of crack cocaine.
Two additional co-defendants have entered guilty pleas and have sentencing hearings pending:
 
• On July 9, 2018, Rufus “Rudy” Parker pled guilty to six counts of distributing cocaine, and on November 30, 2018, he pled guilty to an additional count of conspiring to distribute powder cocaine.
 
• On January 22, 2019, Joseph Anthony Vaught pled guilty to conspiring to distribute and possess with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of cocaine; and possessing a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.
 
Parker and Vaught are currently scheduled to be sentenced in April of this year.
 
These convictions are the result of a long-term undercover operation conducted by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) and officers of the Wilmington Police Department, beginning in December 2016 and continuing until the return of the federal indictment in August of 2017. Dorm, a principal target of the investigation, was a leader of a subset of the Bloods street gang known as the Bounty Hunter Bloods. Dorm held a leadership role in the gang and had three prior state felony drug convictions and two prior state convictions for being a felon in possession of a firearm.
 
During the course of the investigation, law enforcement was able to conduct a large numbers of controlled purchases of contraband from each of the six co-defendants, as well as from five additional men who have pled guilty in separate federal cases. The confidential informant and undercover agents conducted roughly three-dozen transactions, purchasing cocaine, crack cocaine, heroin, counterfeit currency, and multiple firearms. DORM himself made 13 of the sales. In transactions dating from December 14, 2016, to July 10, 2017, DORM sold the CI nearly 600 doses of heroin, 100 doses of fentanyl, 4 grams of crack cocaine, over $1,000 in counterfeit currency, an M4 assault rifle, a second rifle, and five handguns, including two M-11 9mm pistols with high capacity magazines. On another occasion, law enforcement witnessed DORM manufacturing crack cocaine.
 
This case is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), a program bringing together all levels of law enforcement and the communities they serve to reduce violent crime and make our neighborhoods safer for everyone.
 
The investigation of this case was conducted by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms & Explosives (ATF), the Wilmington Police Department, the New HanoverCounty Sheriff’s Office, and the Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office. Assistant United States Attorneys Jake D. Pugh represented the government.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 27 March 2019 11:46
 
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