• Google Bookmarks
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Digg
  • reddit
Federal Government
USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack: Farm to School Programs Create New Opportunities for Farmers, Kids PDF Print E-mail
Federal Government
By Administrator   
Friday, 03 October 2014 09:38

RALEIGH, (SGRToday.com) - The U.S. Department of Agriculture issued the following commentary by Secretary Tom Vilsack about the relationship between schools, local farming, and healthy eating. 

------------------------------
 
"This October, just like every other month during the school year, school menus will feature an array of products from local and regional farmers, ranchers, and fishermen. Kids of all ages will dig up lessons in school gardens, visit farms, harvest pumpkins, and don hair nets for tours of processing facilities. Science teachers – and English, math, and social studies instructors, too – will use food and agriculture as a tool in their classrooms, so that lessons about the importance of healthy eating permeate the school learning environment.
 
An investment in the health of America’s students through Farm to School is also an investment in the farmers and ranchers who grow the food and an investment in the health of local economies. In school year 2011-2012, schools purchased $386 million in local food from farmers, ranchers, fishermen, and food processors and manufacturers. And an impressive 56 percent of school districts report that they will buy even more local foods in future school years. Farm to school programs exist in every state in the country.
 
For example, the Lake County Community Development Corporation in Bozeman, Montana reports a 40 percent increase in revenues to farmers based on school sales alone. The Southwest Georgia Project, a community development non-profit, notes that “We’re actually seeing our farmers have hope. The farm to school program allows them to see an opportunity for a sustainable living for themselves and their families.” Testimonials in a USDA video released this week highlight the degree to which farm to school programs support healthy eating behaviors among children and provide positive economic impacts to local communities.
 
Strengthening local food systems is one of the four pillars of USDA's commitment to rural economic development, and Farm to School programs can play an important role. To support the expansion of Farm to School programs into more schools and expand opportunity for farmers and ranchers, USDA offers grants, training, and technical assistance. Since the start of our Farm to School Grant Program in fiscal year 2013, for example, USDA has awarded grants to 139 projects spanning 46 states and the District of Columbia, serving more than 16,200 schools and 4.55 million students, nearly 43% of whom live in rural communities.
 
Just this week, I visited the George Washington Carver Elementary School in Richmond, Virginia and the Virginia State Fair to announce more than $52 million in new USDA grants nationwide to support the development of the local, regional and organic food sectors. You can learn more about USDA’s investments at www.usda.gov/results 
 
At USDA we’re transforming school food and creating a healthier next generation. We’re happy to celebrate in October, but we’re going to be cheering for schools with farm to school programs all year long. When students have experiences such as tending a school garden or visiting a farm, they’re more likely to make healthy choices in the cafeteria. I see the change every time I visit a cafeteria; students light up when meeting their farmer. They are piling their trays full of healthy foods, they are learning healthy habits that they will carry with them for life, and they are learning an appreciation for the American farmer that they will carry with them their entire lives.
 
 
 
Last Updated on Friday, 03 October 2014 09:39
 
USDA Unveils New Programs To Help Farmers Manage Risk PDF Print E-mail
Federal Government
By Administrator   
Monday, 29 September 2014 10:00

RALEIGH, (SGRToday.com) - Saying that farming is one of the "riskiest businesses in the world," U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has unveiled several programs to help farmers better manage their risk of losses due to circumstances beyond their control. 

 
The initiatives come as the price support program that was in place for decades comes to an end. With that subsidy, farmers were paid for their crops no matter market conditions or whether it was a good or bad crop year.
 
The new programs, Agricultural Risk Coverage (ARC) and Price Loss Coverage (PLC), offer farmers protection when market forces cause substantial drops in crop prices and/or revenues. Producers will have through early spring of 2015 to select which program works best for their businesses, according to the federal agency. 
 
To help farmers choose between ARC and PLC, USDA helped create online tools that allow farmers to enter information about their operation and see projections about what each program will mean for them under possible future scenarios. 
 
"We're committed to giving farmers as much information as we can so they can make an informed decision between these programs," said Vilsack in a statement. "These resources will help farm owners and producers boil the information down, understand what their options are, and ultimately make the best decision on which choice is right for them."
 
Last Updated on Monday, 29 September 2014 10:01
 
President Obama's Remarks To United Nations General Assembly PDF Print E-mail
Federal Government
By Administrator   
Wednesday, 24 September 2014 11:33

RALEIGH, (SGRToday.com) - On Wednesday, President Obama addressed the gathering of world leaders at the United Nations General Assembly. He discussed "pervasive unease in our world."

 
Following is the beginning portion of the president's prepared remarks. The entire speech can be found at whitehouse.gov.
-------------
 
Mr. President, Mr. Secretary General, fellow delegates, ladies and gentlemen:  We come together at a crossroads between war and peace; between disorder and integration; between fear and hope.
 
Around the globe, there are signposts of progress.  The shadow of World War that existed at the founding of this institution has been lifted, and the prospect of war between major powers reduced.  The ranks of member states has more than tripled, and more people live under governments they elected. Hundreds of millions of human beings have been freed from the prison of poverty, with the proportion of those living in extreme poverty cut in half.  And the world economy continues to strengthen after the worst financial crisis of our lives. 
 
Today, whether you live in downtown Manhattan or in my grandmother’s village more than 200 miles from Nairobi, you can hold in your hand more information than the world’s greatest libraries.  Together, we’ve learned how to cure disease and harness the power of the wind and the sun.  The very existence of this institution is a unique achievement -- the people of the world committing to resolve their differences peacefully, and to solve their problems together.  I often tell young people in the United States that despite the headlines, this is the best time in human history to be born, for you are more likely than ever before to be literate, to be healthy, to be free to pursue your dreams.
 
And yet there is a pervasive unease in our world -- a sense that the very forces that have brought us together have created new dangers and made it difficult for any single nation to insulate itself from global forces.  As we gather here, an outbreak of Ebola overwhelms public health systems in West Africa and threatens to move rapidly across borders.  Russian aggression in Europe recalls the days when large nations trampled small ones in pursuit of territorial ambition.  The brutality of terrorists in Syria and Iraq forces us to look into the heart of darkness.
 
Each of these problems demands urgent attention.  But they are also symptoms of a broader problem -- the failure of our international system to keep pace with an interconnected world. We, collectively, have not invested adequately in the public health capacity of developing countries.  Too often, we have failed to enforce international norms when it’s inconvenient to do so.  And we have not confronted forcefully enough the intolerance, sectarianism, and hopelessness that feeds violent extremism in too many parts of the globe.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 24 September 2014 11:34
 
NIH Invests $10 Million In Supplemental Funding To Look At Gender Impacts In Research PDF Print E-mail
Federal Government
By Administrator   
Tuesday, 23 September 2014 09:14

RALEIGH, (SGRToday.com) - Concern with the overreliance on males in preclinical research have helped prompt the National Institutes of Health to steer an additional $10.1 million to grantees. 

 
The goal, according to the agency, is to bolster the research of 82 grantees to explore the effects of sex in preclinical and clinical studies.
 
“This funding strategy demonstrates our commitment to moving the needle toward better health for all Americans, while helping grow our knowledge base for both sexes and building research infrastructure to aid future studies,” said Janine Austin Clayton, M.D., NIH associate director for women’s health research in a news releae. “The scientists receiving these awards have approached their research questions with fresh thinking, and are looking for innovation and discovery through a new lens.”
 
The projects span a wide array of science, including basic immunology, cardiovascular physiology, neural circuitry, and behavioral health. 
Last Updated on Tuesday, 23 September 2014 09:15
 
«StartPrev1234567NextEnd»

Page 3 of 7
Copyright 2011 - All Rights Reserved
3012 Highwoods Blvd., Suite 200
Raleigh, NC 27604
Telephone: (919) 790-9392